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  1. #11

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    I tend to fall into the same camp as those who deem it important to be truthful and not pretend fantasy is reality, but on the other hand, concede the point to those who present it, that childhood's belief in things magical and fantastical, may be a cherished and mystical experience, without which, modern kids really miss out. Who knows what the benefits or importance of believing in fairy tales may yet be revealed to be, for children that age? If a person cannot remember ever believing in fantasy as if it were real, he or she cannot appraise the loss of that experience.

    Learning to differentiate, firmly, between fantasy and reality is a developmental rite of passage, and while it is necessary for full maturation, to go through it, maybe being able to remember what it was like before that, is important in ways some of us can't grasp.

    Alas, for me, I never truly believed in the fantastical, even when it was obvious to me that adults expected me to. So I played the part to keep them happy, and lived with a precocious knowledge of cynicism.

    Figuring my kids are much the same, I spare them the cynicism by sparing them the falsehoods. Yet seeing my friend's kid, in the tween years yet still believing in Santa, makes me realize that people are different, and I am not going to tamper with that kid's universe, unasked. Like pubescent awakening, the timeline and method in which maturation comes is deeply personal, and none of my business.

    Sometimes I wish there had ever been a time when I had believed in fairies. No one tried to prevent me...in fact, my mother tried to encourage me to believe in things she thought were appropriate for young children to believe in. Didn't work.

    I would have been a very bad Waldorfian.
    40-something mom of 4 kids who haven't been to school, taking it one year and one day at a time.

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    ..Montessori kids (surprisingly christians were the minority in her class too so this is still a head-scratcher to me) convinced her at 4 that he was a real guy. ...
    Query: why would them being mostly secular make you surprised there was a Santa myth going on? I thought more evangelicals disliked the Santa myth as a distraction from Christ at Christmas, or worse, a secular displacement and confusion of him. But who knows? Is being pro-Santa more likely or less likely in evangelicals? The most devout and fundamentalist among them that I ever heard from on the point, felt that Santa was a bad thing, a secular takeover of what the holiday was supposed to be about (hence slogans like "Jesus is the Reason for the Season" and so on).

    In your experience, are Christians the ones primarily doing the Santa thing? I wonder if it varies regionally.
    40-something mom of 4 kids who haven't been to school, taking it one year and one day at a time.

  4. #13

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    We do Santa, the Easter Bunny, etc. However, we preferace it by saying "Some people believe in so and so and this is what they do."

    As far as Christmas is concerned, we have always said, Santa is the spirit of Christmas. Is he a real guy that flies around and gives every child in the world a present on one night? No.

    But I do believe in the magic of believing in fairy tales, building those traditions, etc.
    CJ (Mom)
    Bug: 6 years old
    Doodle: 2 years old
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  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by crunchynerd View Post
    Query: why would them being mostly secular make you surprised there was a Santa myth going on? I thought more evangelicals disliked the Santa myth as a distraction from Christ at Christmas, or worse, a secular displacement and confusion of him. But who knows? Is being pro-Santa more likely or less likely in evangelicals? The most devout and fundamentalist among them that I ever heard from on the point, felt that Santa was a bad thing, a secular takeover of what the holiday was supposed to be about (hence slogans like "Jesus is the Reason for the Season" and so on).

    In your experience, are Christians the ones primarily doing the Santa thing? I wonder if it varies regionally.
    It might vary regionally, it is just *I* thought it surprising because the majority of the kids in her class were immigrants here to work for the big local international company. So why would the Korean, Thai, Indian, Chilean, Belorussian kids be wholly down with the Santa myth? I can only think it's 100% trying to fit in to this particular culture. Hell, the kids weren't even fully English fluent yet they chatted up about the big white guy in the red suit. Headscratcher. And not encouraged openly in the Montessori class, not at all. Sure, all holidays were discussed and one big Light Holiday was held near the December solstice...a combo Diwali/Hanukkah/xmas/pagan/etc affair with lots of (electric) candles and food. All I am saying is I thought my kid would be safe in a class of immigrants! but no! When she left the school The Elf on the SHelf was a big deal. I blame the company they all worked for.
    Year five! Singleton 7th grade dd. Science and history with all other subjects supporting 'em. Eclectic-ish.

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Do you do the "believing in Santa" thing at your house?