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  1. #1

    Default need advice please

    Hello everyone! I am a newbie to this site and I am hoping some of you may be able to give me some insight on somethings. I have been using the K12 curriculum through OHVA for the last few years with my son and now with my daughter. Although there are things they both like about the program, there are things that we just simply wish we did not have to deal with. We go through the public school system here for our online schooling and although being able to receive the materials we need at no cost is wonderful, not having the flexibility we desire is straining and stressful. I have been looking at going completely on my own, but we cannot afford some of the programs out there. I was looking at the learning 4 life sight, which seems good, but it only goes up to eighth grade and would only be useful to me for the next year or two at the most. I was also looking at the Robinson curriculum, but I am not sure if that would incorporate all the subjects they need to have to be in compliance with the state curriculum here (Ohio). Does anyone have any programs or suggestion that may help? Any guidance and/or advice will be wonderful.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Evolved mpippin's Avatar
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    Although it takes quite a bit of time (I spent a good six hours in planning for a few weeks' lessons, but I think that will decrease over time) and energy, making your own curriculum is quite cost-effective. I did my research and pulled together books from various sources and put together a curriculum that costs me around $100 up front (and monthly membership fees to a couple websites that total around $30 a month). I don't know anything about Ohio's laws. But you can google "homeschool free" or "homeschool cheap" or something along those lines and you will be quickly overwhelmed with choices.

    There are quite a few popular, completely free, public domain-based curriculum plans online (Ambleside Online, Easy Peasy All in One Homeschool for two). They all seem a bit religious but are adaptable to a more secular way of teaching. I found them all a little too old-fashioned for us and went a more modern route.

    You don't say how old your kids are.

    I'm using Math Mammoth (under $50 for a year's books) and Life of Fred ($15 per book) and IXL.com (monthly membership) and Timez Attack (free version for now, might upgrade) for my 4th grader's math.

    I'm using Story of the World (only bought the student book after reading many reviews, cost me around $10 new on Amazon) for History and supplementing it with hands-on activities and library/internet research.

    Spelling City takes care of spelling and vocabulary for us. Some don't like it but my daughter's in love with it, so I subscribed for the upgrade features and it works for her. That was a one-time $30 cost for a year.

    I will pick and choose for reading. Some books, I'll buy. Others will be free from the library.

    Science is totally library book/internet-driven. Check out Pinterest. You will be amazed at all the teaching materials and ideas there.

    Art only costs us supplies. We get ideas from the internet and library.

    I'm sure I've left things out. The point is that you can educate your child for pretty darn cheap and do a pretty darn good job at it. It just takes more time than a ready-made, scripted set.
    Michelle

    Bay - high school? How the hell did that happen?
    Tuna - upper elementary


    The Eclectic Education of Terrific Tuna

  4. #3

    Default

    Hello and welcome to the forum. We've got some Ohio folks here who might be able to answer your questions, so hopefully they will chime in.
    Wendy
    Mumsy to Gavin (13-year-old artsy boy) and Rowan (3-year-old disco queen)

  5. #4

    Default

    Thank you for the info, I will be sure to start looking into all of that. Right now I am so wrapped up in trying to keep my youngest from getting bored while still implementing what he has to do with this online program that by the time I have time to look things up I am so tired I can't think. At least now I have some guidance and somewhere to start. My children are almost 10 and 12, but in most subjects they could be taught the same curriculum. My youngest (son) is supposed to be in 4th grade according to traditional schooling, but he is doing 6th grade science and 5th grade art and history. My daughter would be ahead as well, but she decided to go back to a brick and mortar school for a year and a half. After dealing with the "drama" and cliques at her school for the last year she asked to come back to home schooling. Honestly, she is doing ok with the program they are in, but my son is bored all the time, and basically it would be a lot easier if I could have them doing mostly the same lessons. Thanks again for the guidance. I will see what I can come up with hopefully this weekend.

  6. #5

    Default

    I just ran across this blog post about free curriculum. I have't tried them out, but it's worth a look:

    Full Online Homeschool Curriculum Options! | How To Homeschool For FREE

    I also have bookmarked a load of resources on Pinterest.
    Karen

    B1 - 11 (6th grader)
    B2 - 15 (10th grader)

    Homeschooled for three years, but due to various circumstances, we put them back into public school. Still here because I feel like I found my tribe.


  7. #6
    Senior Member Evolved mpippin's Avatar
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    Here's my Pinterest list, too.
    Michelle

    Bay - high school? How the hell did that happen?
    Tuna - upper elementary


    The Eclectic Education of Terrific Tuna

  8. #7

    Default

    I've never heard of Learning 4 Life, but please don't follow Robinson. The creator is a complete nut job. The curriculum is not "self-teaching" - that's just bogus. And it's a very narrowminded view of the world, using materials that are so out of date that in several cases they are incorrect, racist, or otherwise backwards thinking. I would not consider it a secular curriculum either.

    I think if you start from the perspective that you need to get a complete curriculum or a box curriculum, then you will find limited options. If you are willing to piece together things, you will find that there are excellent affordable resources out there and that there are highly respected curricula that are completely free. For example, MEP Math is free, KISS Grammar is free... Your kids are middle school age so the ACS's chemistry curriculum is free. Reading literature from the library is free. Even if you start buying things instead of looking for free resources, you'll find that purchasing individual math, science, language arts, etc. curricula can be cheaper than buying even some of the less expensive all-in-one options. Of course, it can also be more expensive - you have to shop around and make choices.
    Disclaimer: Everything I'm saying is just my own opinion, based on my own experiences teaching and with my own kids and my own life. You should just ignore me if I'm annoying you. I don't mind.

    But if I don't annoy you, feel free to visit my blog:
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

  9. #8

    Default

    Thank you all very very much for the info and links. farrarwilliams, thank you for the input on Robinson. This is exactly what I am looking for and what I need, open and honest feed back and guidance. I am going over the laws now in Ohio. Our school district here is pretty small and we have a new superintendent that is younger, so hopefully getting approval will not be an issue as long as I have a basic outline of the mandatory subjects my kids will need to learn and how I intend on teaching them. I am so glad I came across this site. I really wish I would have found it sooner!!!! Thanks again! p.s. sorry I typed the name of the one site wrong. It is Time 4 learning. Lol I have so much info going through my head I mixed up two different things I had come across.

  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ksb427 View Post
    I just ran across this blog post about free curriculum. I have't tried them out, but it's worth a look:

    Full Online Homeschool Curriculum Options! | How To Homeschool For FREE

    I also have bookmarked a load of resources on Pinterest.
    Thank you for both the question and the replies. I am also a newbie, and as funding is slim, this information is very helpful.

  11. #10

    Default

    Oh, Time 4 Learning... It's online learning and several people here have done it and should be able to give feedback on that! It seems like it's been a good transition piece for a lot of people for various reasons or a good thing for awhile, but that most people haven't done it long term?

    If you post for specific subject recommendations, especially if you say what sort of thing you're looking for (more reading, less reading? more hands-on, less hands-on? more projects? more writing? that sort of thing...) then people can suggest things. You can also look at the curriculum directory here. It lists most things that are secular.
    Disclaimer: Everything I'm saying is just my own opinion, based on my own experiences teaching and with my own kids and my own life. You should just ignore me if I'm annoying you. I don't mind.

    But if I don't annoy you, feel free to visit my blog:
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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need advice please