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  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie 4kidsmommy's Avatar
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    Default Greetings from Georgetown, KY

    Hi there! I am brand new to homeschooling. My 10 year old daughter began after our public schools winter break. She is in 5th grade. Due to issues of sexual harassment and a horribly behaved class, my child that is above grade level was failing in several areas. I pulled her and we haven’t looked back. I am currently playing around with what curriculums will work best for her.
    Aside from school, Cassidy loves to read Warrior Cats books, do art, and do Irish Dance. She is the youngest of 4– her siblings are 24, 21, and 20. My husband, her dad, has MS and seizures. I have been home for about 5 years as his primary caretaker, but previously taught in the Head Start program and also did family service work. Looking forward to meeting you all!

  2. T4L In Forum Jan19
  3. #2

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    Welcome!
    Im so sorry to hear your DD has been going through such trauma at the neighborhood school.

    Let us know if we can help in any way.
    Usually when kids are pulled from a toxic environment, they’re given some healing time, known as “deschooling”. We attend a public charter homeschool, even with bureaucratic state attendance demands, they encourage it and suggest ways to meet attendance requirements while still allowing the child to heal.
    And you can always justify it to yourself that you will take it easy now, and work through the summer.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3
    Junior Member Newbie 4kidsmommy's Avatar
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    We are working only on things she is interested in and wants to do at this point. She is an eager learner and wants to learn. So, she actually wants to do more than I suggest. Keeps me on my toes for sure. Thanks for the response! I am grateful to have found this group. In my town, most homeschoolers are bible thumpers. Luckily, my best friend is homeschooling her 6th grader, so I have support.

  5. #4

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    Hmmm. Ive noticed with my kids that when they are doing what they want to do, theyre often not deliberately working on improving their skills. “Doing Art” is a worthwhile activity, but going through even a self-paced course / book will give it that “learning”, school-like component. If she wants to spend school time writing Warriors fan-fic, pick up a writing fiction for kids activity that will formally introduce her to characterization, background, narration, conflict, and other literary components. (They often have a short lesson followed by a prompt - in our house we have just adapted the prompt to reflect what we wanted to write about.)
    Does she want to learn about her dad’s MS? Thats a science. Ireland and irish dancing? That is social studies.
    You dont really need “Grade 5 Curriculum”... so much as you can take her interests and add educational components to cover the subjects. If that makes sense. Then for “grade 6”, you could look at more comprehensive curriculum for each subject area, if you like. (Such as World Geography, or Chemistry, or American History.) No sense plopping down Civil War battles in front of her now, because she really does need some time where she can be inwardly focused.
    I hope that helps. Im not trying to be bossy.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  6. #5
    Junior Member Newbie 4kidsmommy's Avatar
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    Yes!! It makes perfect sense!! She has already written 2 fanfic books. They were actually good. Lol. I welcome all suggestions. This is new to me, as my older kids flourished in public schools. I am so much happier homeschooling, though.

  7. #6

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    I think Im happier than I wouldve been if I sent my kids to PS.
    Mariam from this site (I think it was her) recommended these story blocks, and my son and I enjoyed doing the activities together.
    https://www.amazon.com/How-Tell-Stor...s+story+blocks

    Oh, the best homeschool memories come from the things you do together. You wont remember those math worksheets you assigned to her, but the afternoon you spent together making up crazy stories until you had laughter-induced-incontinence will be something to look back on.
    So the less schooly the materials are that you pick, the happier you two may be from doing them together.
    It also wont take a lot of time. There is no extra homework, and lessons where youre working with her probably wont be efficient after 20-30 minutes.

    Ask when you have auestions, worries, or doubts!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #7

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    Welcome to homeschooling and the forum. I am sorry to hear about the tough time your daughter had at school. She is lucky she has you to homeschool her. My daughter also had a horrible time at school, for other reasons, and now says she never wants to go back (we have been homeschooling about 2.5 years now).

    I had never heard of Warrior Cats. I have put some on hold for my daughter to see if she likes them. She is a voracious reader and its hard to keep up with sometimes.

    I am also sorry to hear about your husband's MS. One of my best friends currently has relapsing-remitting MS. She was diagnosed maybe 10 to 12 years ago. So is just trying to make the most of her life as it usually progresses after 10 to 20 years. My husband has done some research on MS (in biochemistry). Its relatively common in NZ as we are far from the equator, and they think there is some link with the amount of UV you get. My friend who has MS also had a bad case of mononucleosis a few years before she started having MS symptoms, and it is also thought to be linked to MS risk. Do you have good access to medications for it where you are? In NZ, people can only access drugs that have been approved by the government for subsidized use in the public health care system. So on the one hand, they are either free or cheap, but on the other you can't access all the latest things or the full range of drugs that may be available. They have to be quite proven to be effective and for a large proportion of health care users before they get approved.
    New Zealand-based. DD 10 (year 5 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 5 (year 0 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

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Greetings from Georgetown, KY