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  1. #1
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    Default Why year-round homeschooling?

    For those of you who've opted out of a traditional 9-month school schedule and into more of a year-round dynamic, I wondered if you'd share what led you to that decision and how it's working out for you.


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    Since we are unschoolly, slackschoolers there is no beginning or end to the process. Learning looks different depending on the season, travel, work schedules and such. The curriculum/book list I use is really that, a book list. We read books. We watch videos. We do stuff. Not always in that order. For example right now, we are on a vacation. This afternoon we are taking a break in the hotel and DS is watching PBSKids and Minute Physics videos (his own choice). We'll probably go swimming and have dinner later. But for kids even the having fun is learning too.

  4. #3

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    I dont think year-round is necessarily not 9 months of schooling, at the end of the day (year). Breaks get taken when theyre needed (Like December!), vacations occur when its convenient (and often purposefully not when PS kids are out and about, when travel prices are higher).
    I think its a little more weird for homeschoolers to do a traditional Sept-June schooling schedule (when they dont have logistical reasons like non-homeschooled kids or work that is seasonal).
    Learning is supposed to be something our kids enjoy, so arbitrarily saying "none of that for the next 3 months" doesnt set an example that learning is a lifestyle.
    Ose summer months for us are a time to get stuff we didnt do or finish from the previous spring. DS is expected to have a book he is reading (so I can tell him to go read it!), very much the same as when we are doing full-time school. When Im tired of him watching Youtube videos of other people playing minecraft, me being able to say "lets do the next section of chemistry" is a convenient way to put a stop to it. Gives him something to do,

    Is this for a blog article?
    q
    Homeschooling DS11, DS5.

    Atheist.

    My spelling and typing are fine, its my keyboard that doesnt cooperate.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    Since we are unschoolly, slackschoolers there is no beginning or end to the process.
    This is us too.
    Since my children are in middle school and we are not structured it makes sense to continue year round. However, the outsourced classes my children take are typically Sept. through mid-May.
    Starting 8th grade (our fifth year homeschooling)
    Dumplett (girl - age 13) and Wombat (boy - age 13)

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    I think its a little more weird for homeschoolers to do a traditional Sept-June schooling schedule (when they dont have logistical reasons like non-homeschooled kids or work that is seasonal).
    Agreed! And it's interesting, because I've noted that more and more of our local schools are even opting to transition to a year-round schedule. And for those that haven't, I've seen school starting earlier and earlier every year.

    You asked what inspired this question. We're going to be focusing on year-round schooling next month here at SHS and I thought it would be awesome to have some input from our own members on what spurred you toward it.


  7. #6
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    We started year-round schooling pretty early in our journey. I learned quickly that despite how lovely long periods of time off may sound, they really don't work. More than a couple of weeks off our routine, without having major plans, and the kids get bored and cranky. They turn into screen zombies. Trying to fill the summer with one fun event after another is hardly a break for me.

    For us it works best to take about a week off at a time. We usually have a few tasks to accomplish like haircuts, tire rotations whatnot and the rest of the break is for being totally lazy.

    We also take periodic breaks from our usual school routine. Summer is always light. We might do a unit study in the spring when burnout starts creeping in. We go interest led when someone is really into something. Vacations, museums, hikes - count as school, but give us a break from the day-to-day. The ability to not worry about the change in pace / flow / energy of the year is definitely a benefit of year-around schooling.
    Rebecca
    DS 12, DD 10
    Year 6

  8. #7

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    From the very beginning, I have not even thought about NOT going year-round. Does not make any sense to us to take long breaks because, apart from losing skills and breaking routines, they undermine important HS philosophy that 1)learning is fun, and 2)learning is life.

    Also, we like to be outside as much as possible, and it makes sense to us to do less when the weather is great, and to do more when the weather is bad.
    mom to 3 girls: DD9, DD8, DD5

  9. #8

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    Oh, slackschooling, what a love/hate relationship we have together...

    We, too, are at this end, and therefore, need to school all year round because we aren't always schooling.

    However, back in the early days, when everything was bright and shiny, we schooled year round because it made sense with my husbands schedule. Now, it makes sense because we get little done in the winter because of sports and my work schedule.

    I think it also sends a message to the kids that learning never stops. There isn't a schedule. Every day has the opportunity to hold learning opportunities, it is up to each one of us to choose how we spend our days.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    I initially decided because long breaks didn't work. It was too hard to get back into a groove, and we often ended up drifting a bit during longer breaks. But then, like other people have said, we have quite an erratic schedule, so it's nice to be able to take breaks whenever we need to. There's really no point for us to have a hugely long break through the summer just because PS kids are out

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  11. #10

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    More breaks and vacations. We travel a lot and didn't want to vacation school
    Also when "scheduling" hours based on state requirements, shorter days to get hours in was attractive.

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