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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topsy View Post
    For those of you who've opted out of a traditional 9-month school schedule and into more of a year-round dynamic, I wondered if you'd share what led you to that decision and how it's working out for you.

    Since the divorce they go to their dad's out-of-state for three weeks every quarter. This gives me clearly defined periods of "vacation" and dates for a school calendar. Also I use MBTP which is organized into nine week segments. It's perfect.

    I recommend both MBTP and year round schooling highly.
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  3. #12
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    The ability to not worry about the change in pace / flow / energy of the year is definitely a benefit of year-around schooling.
    This is something I constantly struggle with, personally: the tendency to believe that a schedule is a schedule and that if something isn't jiving, it's probably my problem and not a problem with the schedule itself. The ability to change, as you put it, pace/flow/energy depending on the need of the time of year is something I have always battled with. Goes along with other tendencies I have toward rigid thinking. But it SOUNDS idyllic!!!


  4. #13

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    If I didn't school year round, we wouldn't ever get enough done. It lets us be lazy, honestly.

    This summer, for the first time, we may be forced by circumstances to take off all of July and August. I'm freaking out a little.
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  5. #14

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    So this is my first post here after lurking longtime and learning so much from this awesome forum :-) Like so many others have mentioned, the difficulty in getting back into a groove after a long break did not work well for us, especially for my son who has a range of learning challenges. It was just too hard to get momentum back, especially when he was littler (he is now 12). We just take a couple of weeks off whenever we need to, or I see that the kids need to, otherwise, we just keep ticking along. Going year-round also seems to compensate for the fact that we only tend to have a pretty short morning of 'structured' learning in my house. I like to make sure we have plenty of time for swimming in waterholes, cooking, art and for my kids to tinker around with their own projects in the afternoon. And then there is days off for homeschool group catch ups once a week, and spontaneous trips to the beach or a river, that eat into the week. I can be more relaxed about doing shorter school days and taking days off if i know we just keep plodding all year! Also, we live in Far North Queensland, Australia (hardcore tropics). It is best to just hide away in front of the fans and keep homeschooling through sweltering Dec/Jan (our summer break) until the rains come, and then come out and enjoy the wet season when all the other kids have gone back to school:-)

  6. #15

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    We've always done year round. When the kids had a private teacher she got away from it a little bit and did those summer "bridge" type workbooks instead of continuing their regular work at a slower pace. Now I'm back home, I'm going back to doing our regular math and language arts year round.

    We do it so that when everyone keeps getting sick in February and March (we're on round three or four right now), we don't have to panic, so that we can go on vacation for two weeks around Memorial Day without worrying about getting enough done, we can take advantage of field trip opportunities.

    I don't have to report, test, or do any kind of notification at all so I really could do whatever I want.
    Dorothy
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  7. #16
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wagtail View Post
    and spontaneous trips to the beach or a river
    isn't spontaneous fun and learning one of the absolute biggest perks of homeschooling??!!


  8. #17

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    Because my son couldn't handle change. He is dyslexic. He has the memory issues that go with that. He forgets stuff if we are not constantly working on it. Times tables, processes, phonics....

    Also, when he was younger, he had meltdowns when we started school. Epic, large, horrible melt downs that I associated with our spectrum friend who hates changes. Over my expectations for the day. Day one of school, each kid writes or copies there grade on a piece of paper and I take a photo. That is my expectation for the day. He COULD NOT HANDLE IT. For several years in a row. And all the forgotten stuff.

    He is now 6th grade. The last two years we did some stuff....all summer long. Some math, some reading. And it has gotten better, both the lack of meltdowns and the remembering of material. Even a week off...right now is spring break, and we are doing some math, trying to get him up to grade level as the spiral math we were doing....was not enough. It is okay....especially since he broke his toe and and can't go out and play with friends....I am kind of bummed that we couldn't go camping and had to wait to see the foot doctor today though. He wouldn't have done math...but he would have journaled in is composition book we keep in the camper for when going on trips.

    How is this working out? Better. Not flawless....I think Math On The Level with their new automated 5-a-day problems is in our future. (Great, unschooling program...didn't work well with the issues with dyslexia. Loved it for my older two.) I think those 5 problems a day, once he is caught up, will help him to remember the things he needs to know....I hope.

  9. #18
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyGooseLady View Post
    Because my son couldn't handle change. He is dyslexic. He has the memory issues that go with that. He forgets stuff if we are not constantly working on it. Times tables, processes, phonics...
    Holy cannoli, CGL...you could be describing my youngest almost exactly! He has dyslexia, but is also actually on the spectrum. Same deal with the retention issues after breaks and the starting back to school meltdowns. UGH!


  10. #19

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    We've opted for year round homeschooling because it allows us more flexibility throughout the year, as others have stated, for breaks, work schedules, sickness, etc. We don't stick to a traditional "school schedule" throughout the day. I love the term "slackschooling" We live on a farm and our children are very active and into different things, so they are constantly learning. The true online or textbook curriculum happens after I get home from work for an hour or two. She'll often do her math and reading without me before I get home. So really how much time we spend together on learning in the evening is driven by what she did during the day on her own. It's worked for us thus far and she's ahead of everything she *should* know by her age, so I'm just going to continue on with it.

  11. #20

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    I am nodding my head in agreement as I read through the previous posts!

    Freedom, flow, going at our own pace, not feeling like learning is a start and stop process, moving on when ready, following the seasons of the year as well as life, taking breaks when WE need them, taking time off when everyone else is in school, learning what/when/how based on the individual person instead of grade levels, we can be lazy or crazy busy. Honestly, I cannot wrap my mind around homeschooling my 7 kids on that insane schedule!
    Learning, Living, and Loving Life outside of the norm with 7 kids.

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