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  1. #11

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    Physics Principles with Applications by Giancoli is an algebra-based physics course. There are also student guides and a full instructor's solutions manual with everything worked out available. I was able to find everything used via Amazon and thriftbooks.

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  3. #12

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    Inmom, As far as safety goes, I am more worried about him hurting himself, I think. My son's splinter skills are such that dealing with heat, sharp objects or pouring caustic chemicals is likely not going to go well. We are going to have a huge delay in actually going away somewhere for college, regardless -- so we are just going to have to muddle through the best we can.

    Paper dissections sound doable, and as long as they do not look cute, maybe it will not freak him out. He loves animals and would never want to feel like he is harming one. He is not quite a vegetarian, but he won't eat anything that looks too much like its animal of origin, and certain animals he will not eat.

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    I honestly wouldn't start with chemistry if possible - I'd do physics, physical science, Earth science, Env. Sci, or bio first. (Assuming you're not going interest led.)

    But the lack of math is the biggest drawback for the whole Conceptual series. If you do the online course, apparently they have an algebra based supplement lab book now.
    I am going to try not to start with chem, but I am pretty sure I want do do it before bio. i was thinking for 9th grade, meteorology or astronomy or earth science or something like that. Then I am going to have to look at our math schedule and how it compares to our science curriculum's math. If he is sufficiently ahead, I don't think the order will matter too much. I was thinking maybe 10th grade: chem, 11th grade: bio, and 12th grade: physics depending on math progress.

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luv2HS View Post
    Physics Principles with Applications by Giancoli is an algebra-based physics course. There are also student guides and a full instructor's solutions manual with everything worked out available. I was able to find everything used via Amazon and thriftbooks.
    Cool. I will check it out, thank you.

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by HobbitinaHobbitHole View Post
    I am going to try not to start with chem, but I am pretty sure I want do do it before bio. i was thinking for 9th grade, meteorology or astronomy or earth science or something like that. Then I am going to have to look at our math schedule and how it compares to our science curriculum's math. If he is sufficiently ahead, I don't think the order will matter too much. I was thinking maybe 10th grade: chem, 11th grade: bio, and 12th grade: physics depending on math progress.
    If your son has a solid algebra 1 background with a smattering of trig (basic use of sine, cosine, tangent, and Pythagorean theorem), he's ready for physics, even Giancoli's physics which is on the slightly more rigorous end of high school physics books. (I taught with both that text and the Conceptual Physics text when I worked in ps--each aimed at different needs of students).
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward

    Daughter (21), a University of Iowa senior triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son (20), a Purdue University junior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

  7. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    If your son has a solid algebra 1 background with a smattering of trig (basic use of sine, cosine, tangent, and Pythagorean theorem), he's ready for physics, even Giancoli's physics which is on the slightly more rigorous end of high school physics books. (I taught with both that text and the Conceptual Physics text when I worked in ps--each aimed at different needs of students).
    We should be good then,I hope. We should have algebra I done this year, and next year we are going to be doing a fun combination of geometry/basic trig/very basic topology. We will be picking up more trig when we do pre-calc, so I can always hold off on physics until then, if the basic trig we do next year (8th grade) is insufficient.

  8. #17

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    Zumdahl's World of Chemistry is what we are using next year. I went through it closely last night. It looks very user friendly.

    Holt's science and math books are user friendly. If you buy used, look for the teacher one stop disks. I have/ like the Holt Biology Farrar mentioned.

    Physics was harder this year for my currently in Geometry but mathy kiddo. She needed more than conceptual, but not a college text. We ended up going with Georgia Public Broadcasting's Physics Fundamentals. Answer key, but no solutions, and no word banks for the fill in the blank exercises. We've got a little bit left to go, so I ordered a couple of high school texts through ILL, including the Holt Physics text I think goes with it.

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luv2HS View Post
    Physics Principles with Applications by Giancoli is an algebra-based physics course. There are also student guides and a full instructor's solutions manual with everything worked out available. I was able to find everything used via Amazon and thriftbooks.
    Can you link this? I would love to hear about how you used it. I had a Giancoli text we didn't end up using because I couldn't find the solutions manual for a reasonable price, although I really wanted to use it. It seemed pretty overwhelming to use for a high school text. Maybe I had a different book? I did find this site for $60/ year: https://www.giancolianswers.com/

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ella Darcy View Post
    Can you link this? I would love to hear about how you used it. I had a Giancoli text we didn't end up using because I couldn't find the solutions manual for a reasonable price, although I really wanted to use it. It seemed pretty overwhelming to use for a high school text. Maybe I had a different book? I did find this site for $60/ year: https://www.giancolianswers.com/
    I can't answer for Luv2HS, but I use an older edition of Giancoli's text to save money, like this one here.

    Also for answers and solutions, try Slader.com. Input the ISBN of the textbook you have.

    In general, high school science texts can be overwhelming. Never expect to complete a book within an academic year. Most teachers have to decide what to keep and what to cut. For example, when I taught out of Giancoli's text, I was only able to teach two-thirds of the material within a school year. Keep that in mind!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward

    Daughter (21), a University of Iowa senior triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son (20), a Purdue University junior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ella Darcy View Post
    Zumdahl's World of Chemistry is what we are using next year. I went through it closely last night. It looks very user friendly.

    Holt's science and math books are user friendly. If you buy used, look for the teacher one stop disks. I have/ like the Holt Biology Farrar mentioned.

    Physics was harder this year for my currently in Geometry but mathy kiddo. She needed more than conceptual, but not a college text. We ended up going with Georgia Public Broadcasting's Physics Fundamentals. Answer key, but no solutions, and no word banks for the fill in the blank exercises. We've got a little bit left to go, so I ordered a couple of high school texts through ILL, including the Holt Physics text I think goes with it.
    Ella, how was the GPB course? I mean, at $20, it's a steal. However, I looked it previously and I was unsure about things like labs and lab materials and whether or not its algebra based, which is a real requirement for me with physics next year. I didn't realize the Holt text went with it either.

    ETA: Right now I'm kind of planning on the Derek Owens class since it's algebra based, but not calculus based, and it has the lab kit. But if I could save that $ to put elsewhere without putting out a lot of other effort, then I'd be into that.
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