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  1. #11
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    The school that DS might go to has a lot of outdoor time and education, that's one of the things that appeals to both of us. I'm a bit less enamored with them recently. Mainly that they're so crunchy and hippy and the *ahem* anti-scientific stuff I hear. I'm not sure DH could ever attend an event *there*! (he's not going to be sitting on the floor and singing along with other parents). Anyway. They don't have a space now, and maybe the Friday thing he does will work out. We're got more to do in the week at the moment so he's complaining less about not having friends around. It still would be easier for me if he went to school, but we're so close to the end of the school year now anyway that I am still going to have the summer when I'm trying to work and keep an eye on him!

    Elly
    Edited for spelling!
    Last edited by Elly; 01-30-2017 at 09:05 PM.
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

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  3. #12

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    We are looking into kiddos doing an elective or 2 at the local school. For my daughter that is ok. She really wants Drama class and they offer it. luckily the school is only 15 minutes away but she still wants to continue with homeschool. YAY!!!! My son is grumbling about wanting to go but the school itself is unwilling to work with his special needs. Which is why we pulled him out in the first place. The principal/superintendent (same person) tried to put blame on son for behaviors that are part of his Asperger's and he had an IEP for. So we are talking son into maybe doing an elective at ps when he gets to high school level. he is 7th right now. We have our days where I want him to go but also know it wouldn't be good for him. We live in a rural area ourselves. There are many homeschool families but they mostly homeschool for religious reasons only so we are the outsiders. There are no co ops and the ps is not too cooperative unless the kid is wanting to play sports then they bend over backwards.
    living the life in small town Idaho and loving every minute of it. http://mtnmagyk.wix.com/mtnmagyk Our blog .

  4. #13

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    Sorry they are difficult, cailet. OUr PS won't allow HSed students to participate in anything, it's left up the the individual schools, and ours does not support having students come in just for specials. Have you looked into other groups, like 4H? There are religious people there, but it doesn't feel churchy like a HS coop would!
    Mom to 5 great kids~

  5. #14
    Senior Member Arrived lakshmi's Avatar
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    NOPE the only towels here get thrown in the washer... well.. and on the floor.. and on the foot of the bed.. and ... well. you get the idea. The school towels will remain folded neatly.
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  6. #15
    Senior Member Evolved aselvarial's Avatar
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    We keep considering it. The local Montessori school just closed down (though it may re-open elsewhere so I'm keeping an eye on it). A new charter school is opening, but their school day is going to be 7:30-4, and I'm simply NOT comfortable with a more than 8 hour school day for Tech. I'm sort of considering the local Sudbury school, but every article I try to read on it is either unbelievably positive, or starts of with wonderful things like calling children "untethered brats", at which point I stop reading because anyone writing an article that calls children brats merely because they aren't in public school, is so ungodly biased as to not be worth reading.

    The biggest downside to all of this is, we're night owls. DH works 12 hour nights, and to afford a private school, I'd have to go back to work, so Tech and I would be living on one schedule and DH on another. DH and I did that 10 years ago before we added the stress of Tech, and we wound up splitting up for 4 months over it. DH could possibly move to a day schedule at the plant, but that department won't open for a year, it's 5 days a week instead of just 3 or 4, and they run 1 product all the time (instead of like 12-15). He's already said he'd hate it.

    I'm also considering just doing a year of complete unschooling. Where I don't actually insist on him learning anything at all, and see just how we all do with complete unschooling. I'm just not sure I can do it!
    1 son - Tech- '09
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  7. #16

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    I'm constantly in this re-evaluation mode. But I always end up in the same place. The two parts of our curriculum that DD loves the most - Russian and music, would be impossible to replicate were she in out-of-home school. We could consider some sort of blended program as our district is favourable to the concept, but DD doesn't deal well with frequent or rapid transitions. Since we started HS three years ago to keep up with her practice schedule - and, if anything, that's gotten more demanding, I don't know that I could make the puzzle pieces fit, even if I wanted to throw in the towel.
    DD age 8, Grade 3ish

    Eclectic. We do music, math English, history/geography/culture, Russian and science. Lots and lots of reading. I blog at suzukiexperience.com

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  8. #17
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNDad View Post
    I'm constantly in this re-evaluation mode. But I always end up in the same place. The two parts of our curriculum that DD loves the most - Russian and music, would be impossible to replicate were she in out-of-home school. We could consider some sort of blended program as our district is favourable to the concept, but DD doesn't deal well with frequent or rapid transitions. Since we started HS three years ago to keep up with her practice schedule - and, if anything, that's gotten more demanding, I don't know that I could make the puzzle pieces fit, even if I wanted to throw in the towel.
    The "juggling" of a blended program has always felt really daunting to me, but probably because of my own personality than even my kiddos'. I feel sure a blended schedule opens kids up to wider viewpoints and wider opportunities, it just feels hard, I guess.
    Topsy
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  9. #18

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    I don't think I could even if I wanted to. DS is so repulsed by the idea of school, he would never go back, as least at this point, he's 9, he could change his mind in 2 years. I can't see sending him back unless we had a major life change and even with that, I would juggle my schedule to provide the opportunity to stay at home.
    Choosing Our Own Adventure with DS 9
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  10. #19
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aselvarial View Post
    I'm also considering just doing a year of complete unschooling. Where I don't actually insist on him learning anything at all, and see just how we all do with complete unschooling. I'm just not sure I can do it!
    I was definitely the biggest barrier to our unschooling years (middle school). Just about the time I thought I had completely let go of educational expectations something would trigger "fear of failure" mode and I'd be second guessing and researching curriculum again. But in retrospect it was truly a wonderful choice for the middle years of homeschooling. They had enough formal instruction that they were able to parlay that into following their true interests. And once they'd followed many of their curiosities to the point of near-boredom they were asking for formal curriculum again. It worked out super nicely, actually.
    Topsy
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  11. #20
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    I don't think I could even if I wanted to. DS is so repulsed by the idea of school, he would never go back, as least at this point, he's 9, he could change his mind in 2 years. I can't see sending him back unless we had a major life change and even with that, I would juggle my schedule to provide the opportunity to stay at home.
    I'm relieved that it's not just my 9 year old who finds the idea of school abhorrent (and he's never even been, apart from preschool!). Well, I mean, he likes his alternative school, but doesn't seem to consider it school.

    I wish my in-laws (well, MIL in particular) would stop saying things to him like 'all kids really love school, they just pretend they don't'.

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

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