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  1. #1

    Default Fitting it all in!

    I've found myself having this thought over and over so far this year...worrying that we won't get in all the learning that we want to get to within our allotted time for this homeschooling gig! Grant it, it's our first year at it and we're still so excited. I'm a sucker for looking into more opportunities too, and we're still feeling things out for our teaching/guiding/learning styles.

    It's just that after being in public school for so long, we're just reveling in the freedom of discovery and time!! Does anyone else feel this or are we just crazy, it being our first year and all?
    May my heart be kind, my mind fierce, and my spirit brave. Learning at Home with Me
    Homeschooling DD (13)

  2. Global Village Forum Post - Sep
  3. #2

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    I interpret your question two ways.

    First is the potential "worry" interpretation. That your child might not learn what the other kids in school are learning. The answer to that is to realize that no one school teaches everything. Every child will lack some knowledge others have, and vice versa.

    Second is the realization is that there is SO MUCH TO LEARN about the world and only so much time. This is very, very true. The best you can do as a homeschooling parent is to teach your child to learn how to learn, so that he or she is a life-long learner. And that's okay. Nobody learns everything they need to know by the time they are 18 or 19. (As much as some of them THINK they know everything!!)

    Not sure if this answers your question or if I'm completely off point. Just bit tired here tonight....
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years

    Daughter (20), a University of Iowa junior triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies

    Son (19), a Purdue University sophomore majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I interpret your question two ways.

    Second is the realization is that there is SO MUCH TO LEARN about the world and only so much time. This is very, very true. The best you can do as a homeschooling parent is to teach your child to learn how to learn, so that he or she is a life-long learner. And that's okay. Nobody learns everything they need to know by the time they are 18 or 19. (As much as some of them THINK they know everything!!)

    Not sure if this answers your question or if I'm completely off point. Just bit tired here tonight....
    YES! This is more along the lines of where I'm at...we're so pumped to be LEARNING period! About things we're interested in. I guess I'm just sharing our excitement and the sometimes overwhelming feeling that there is so much out there that's amazing and interesting for us to happen upon. This feeling wasn't there for the past few years. I'm feeling really, really, really lucky that we're able to do this finally.

  5. #4

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    Happydays525,
    We've been homeschooling since Kinder and I still feel the way you feel from time to time. There have been many incomplete "workbooks" over the years as well as unfinished projects. There have also been many tangents taken where the learning that took place was beyond anything I thought kids could do by their own undertaking. But, off the top of my head my kids: can cook decent healthy meals, know how to bake almost anything from scratch, both dd and ds can sew for fun and repairs, can make fire at least 4 different ways, have read every classic that is age-appropriate and will continue to do so, can tell you in their own words what civics is, how the electoral process works, know how to amend soil for specific plants (they blew someone's mind when they told them their avocado tree wasn't producing because it needed a certain nutrient and that their palms had chemical burns from too much fertilizer), can grow pretty much any fruit, vegetable, etc., they know some plants grow from seed, some from shoots, some have to sprout from tops, etc., they know how to graft, they know which plants need cold snaps, they know to use preying mantis' and lady bugs to control bugs, they know impressionism, realism, surrealism, cubism, how to make papier mache from scratch, how to use a pottery wheel, know color theory, perspective, know how solar, wind, geothermal, and wave energy work, know how desalinization works, can look at a rock and know what it is, know about Norse, Greek, Roman, and Hawaiian gods, can accurately describe all the different Asian cultures, know about the origins of our country, know about the underground railroad, know about the suffrage movement, know about conservation, know about certain bird and whale migrations, know when to stay out of the ocean, can read and play music, enjoy everything from Chopin to Metallica, both enjoy math because even though I wasn't strong in math I presented it as "fun puzzles for your head" and continued to keep it positive even when things got hard for them here and there, know how to form their own opinions based on their own fact finding not just taking someone's word as fact, etc. Are any of these things on standardized tests? Most of them aren't; does that make the knowledge not valid? I think not. I know there are holes and that there will be holes by the time college rolls around--I'm still learning so much I didn't learn in school and I had a good education. For example, dd still struggles with the five paragraph essay (sigh) and ds doesn't like writing in general. But, they can both write in cursive and in detail when they want for their own needs. So, happydays--just breathe and enjoy your time with your child because the time flies.

    I wish I could stop worrying but I think it's par for the course we are all on. At least it's not constant, it comes and goes randomly.
    Kids are so much more than a test score.
    Qualities not measured by a test: creativity, persistence, curiosity, humor, self-discipline, empathy, humility and so many more!

  6. #5

    Default

    This is our sixth year homeschooling and I still feel this way, too. I find that I can get carried away with planning too much. Sometimes I have to slow down and remember to be present now and to continue on the path we set. We won't get to it all, but we will get to enough. Also, being flexible to chase rabbit trails as they arise really helps. It all counts as learning.
    ​​~ DD-13 homeschooled
    ~ DS-17 formerly homeschooled, now attending private school

  7. #6
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    I still feel that way and I was one of those obnoxious toddler parents who took the three year old and the infant to Park Day every week a quarter of a century ago.

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    Coming from the "looking back on homeschooling" perspective (we're all finished here) I'm 100% in agreement with inmom. Without a doubt, the single most important thing my sons learned during our years of homeschooling was that you NEVER STOP LEARNING. They are living on their own now, and not a conversation with them goes by without one of them (or me) sharing with each other something we recently learned about the world. I love that they "got the bug" during homeschool and that it has never abated. Curiosity is contagious. So is enthusiasm for knowledge. By modeling those to your kids, you are beating the curve of every other educational model.


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Fitting it all in!