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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    Obviously easier is better, but I wouldn't decide where to move based primarily on homeschool regulations. I'd choose a strong secular homeschool community over no regulations in a place with no secular homeschool community in a heartbeat. And in terms of the moderate states, most of them really are pretty easy.
    Yes. As dbsam also knows, Indiana is a very easy place to homeschool in terms of regulations. But remember, we are the "Mike Pence" state. Very conservative and stifling in terms of social issues. Even the local inclusive homeschool group has leaned more religious in past years. (We personally have not participated actively in about 6 years.)
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years

    Daughter (20), a University of Iowa sophomore triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies

    Son (19), a Purdue University freshman majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Yes. As dbsam also knows, Indiana is a very easy place to homeschool in terms of regulations. But remember, we are the "Mike Pence" state. Very conservative and stifling in terms of social issues. Even the local inclusive homeschool group has leaned more religious in past years. (We personally have not participated actively in about 6 years.)
    We made that mistake too--lots of research into low cost of living, lots of research into high per capita population of homeschoolers and we rented a house where the two graphs intersected and loaded up the UHaul.

    I have since grown to love my home for reasons unrelated to homeschooling, but don't really want to hang out with the fundies or jump through a lot of charter school hoops just for park day, so we're a lot more isolated than we were in "this place sucks and homeschooling is my life now so let's move", lol.

    Also things change. California is a low reg state on the map but you might want to keep an eye on Senator Pan. Pennsylvania is a high reg state on the map but my mom had no trouble (or support) when she enrolled me in University of Nebraska-Lincoln's correspondence program, handed me a box of books, and wondered why I didn't magically transmorgrify into Grant Colfax or Vita Wallace back in the '70s.
    I am not a robot.

    Neither are any of my kids.

    homeschooling ds9
    homeschooled dd28 (Grad student, UC Berkeley, Journalism) and ds25 (Spc. in US Army, deployed, Operation Spartan Shield)

  4. #13

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    dp
    Last edited by IEF; 12-12-2016 at 03:37 PM. Reason: board acting funny; no worries, Topsy, just keep us safe.
    I am not a robot.

    Neither are any of my kids.

    homeschooling ds9
    homeschooled dd28 (Grad student, UC Berkeley, Journalism) and ds25 (Spc. in US Army, deployed, Operation Spartan Shield)

  5. #14
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    Florida is medium regulations for Homeschoolers, but we have a loophole for Private Schoolers. I use an umbrella school - a free private school for homeschoolers where I only need to report attendance 4x per year. This is literally just clicking "Here" and promising that throughout the 365 days of the year I will complete 180 days of school. A day of school is whatever you decide, so no further oversight there, no testing, nothing else. We have pockets of secular homeschoolers, usually gathered near the larger cities.
    Finishing up kindergarten with my oldest and two little ones always underfoot. Kindergarten was awesome. We used Build Your Library and an eclectic mix for math. Everything else was child led.

  6. #15

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    Much of the homeschooling community in Hawaii is also conservative, as most of the community is military. So despite being in a very blue state, the homeschool community I spend most of my time with is solidly red. Like you BakedAK, I am reeling and it is so hard when you can't freely express your views without fear of censorship from the group. I wouldn't care if they kicked me out, but don't want ramifications for my kids.
    Beth
    DS13 with ASD, DD9 and DS7

  7. #16

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    Geogia is a pretty easy state to homeschool in, BUT, unless you live in and immediately around Atlanta, SECULAR groups can be hard to find. And anywhere housing is cheap, is pretty much guaranteed to be highly religious. The more money, the higher the likelihood of having a secular homeschool group. (no idea WHY this is, but that seems to be the way it is in Georgia).

  8. #17

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    The map linked above has NJ as moderate but it's actually super-easy. We don't have any regulations except to provide "an equivalent education" with the burden on the state. There's no reporting, no notification, no testing, nothing.

    We're also fairly liberal, very diverse, easy to find secular homeschoolers. I would say the estimate on the map for the % of homeschoolers may not be accurate as well, considering we don't have to report to anyone. There's no list of who homeschools here.
    Dorothy
    Back home after three years!!
    Steph - college Graduate!!!
    George - 8/2005
    Vicki - 7/2007
    Dottie's Homeschool Universe

  9. #18

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    Texas is pretty much a free-for-all. Some areas, like Austin, can be very liberal and have a strong secular community. Other areas, not so much.

    I would hesitate to move to a state based solely on an existing secular homeschool community, however. Homeschoolers are a very changeable bunch. The great secular community that exists today could evaporate in 18 months, and then what do you do?

    Good job, affordable housing, and then the "extras": parks, libraries, public transport, shops, and the general vibe of the area. Just my opinion, but I think if you pick a place you would be happy living, regardless of homeschool status, you will do better.

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