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  1. #11
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    Ditto to PP. You have fun because they make your life easier - if they want to learn something they're going to learn it.

    For my kiddo, it's become less about content (because I know he absorbs content like a sponge) and more about the scaffolding around the knowledge - keeping track of assignments, writing the papers, actually studying for a test (just because he knows the stuff doesn't meant the prof's going to ask questions the way he'd think to answer them) and test taking strategies.
    4 kids. 2 launched - Fabulous Daughter (FD) and Eldest Son (ES); 2 in the nest - Boy1 (B1) 11/14/98 & Boy Other One (BOO) 12/16/00

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  3. #12

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    I have two like this. We are covering most subjects at a basic level, supplementing heavily. Finding appropriate science curriculum is tough. In the early elementary grades, the content of grade-level science curricula is too basic. The content of higher level curricula is better, but my children are not up to the expected level of output. (Writing skills are not advanced.) We read/learn about current interests outside of lesson time. So they learn a lot about human anatomy and a little bit about nutrition and hygiene. A lot about physical geography and a little bit of cultural geography.

    I second finding something he needs to work at - a musical instrument, a sport, a foreign language. Then require that he put the effort into learning it. Too often gifted individuals are able to soar through academics without ever really working at anything. They don't know what to do when faced with a challenge. Or when faced with having to repeat a boring task over and over again.

  4. #13

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    Thanks everyone! That was really helpful. bcnlvr - my son only wants to read books about food/vitamins and stars right now, so I'm having him read with me and his older brother some classic books. He would never read them on his own, so hopefully this will encourage him to enjoy reading other types of books. He seems to be enjoying it so far. My older son loves fiction and is always reading. I can choose books for him and he loves most of them.

    Stella - that is a good point about focusing on weaknesses. For him it is handwriting and writing in general. He can write a couple of sentences about a topic, but we need to work on this. I started having the boys do notebooking pages for some subjects and they both seem to like it, so I'll stick with that.
    Homeschooling two boys, ages 7 and 11

  5. #14

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    Do you ever take your son on a field trip to the grocery store, Lynne? My son is super interested in nutrition as well and can spend hours reading food labels. He is especially fond of looking at products that we DON'T buy, and that totally gross him out. He recently spent over half an hour reading the labels of every.single. Lunchables box on the grocery store shelf (who knew there are so many?).

    He will totally berate (um, educate) others for their food choices though, so we have to talk about that a lot, how to just keep quiet. But his interest does help keep me on the straight and narrow, since I can't buy junk when he's around! And, especially since he is so active in sports, he does take a real pride in eating well and making good choices. He knows it has a positive effect on not just his game but his long term health as well.
    Mama to one son (12)

  6. #15

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    Writing and input vs. output for us here this year, too. Having high hopes!
    Mama to one son (12)

  7. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeymom View Post
    Do you ever take your son on a field trip to the grocery store, Lynne? My son is super interested in nutrition as well and can spend hours reading food labels. He is especially fond of looking at products that we DON'T buy, and that totally gross him out. He recently spent over half an hour reading the labels of every.single. Lunchables box on the grocery store shelf (who knew there are so many?).

    He will totally berate (um, educate) others for their food choices though, so we have to talk about that a lot, how to just keep quiet. But his interest does help keep me on the straight and narrow, since I can't buy junk when he's around! And, especially since he is so active in sports, he does take a real pride in eating well and making good choices. He knows it has a positive effect on not just his game but his long term health as well.
    Oh, Yes! He loves reading the "stats" on all the foods. I can't buy junk either when he's with me and it's tough because my 11 yo wants donuts but if both kids won't eat them, it's too much.
    Homeschooling two boys, ages 7 and 11

  8. #17

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    I highly recommend that you look into Project Based Learning as described by Lori Pickert at her website, Project-Based Homeschooling. I have been devouring her new book on the subject. I can't wait to incorporate her ideas into our routine this year. She basically believes in students choosing, directing, and managing their own work with you, the parent, as their mentor. It's not about assigning parent-chosen projects or projects from their curriculum. It sounds like your son has already taken the initiative to learn in this manner. Lori's book explains how to help you mentor and support your child's learning. She also has a forum in which she actively participates. I can't say enough about her ideas.
    ​​~ DD-13 homeschooled
    ~ DS-16 formerly homeschooled, now attending private school

  9. #18

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    I believe that it's just the choice of word that makes us hesitant to discuss our kids in public. "Gifted" implies a value judgment, but the fact is that different kids develop differently and have different needs. No one thinks a mom who says her kid is "autistic" is bragging. Research shows that dyslexic people are in general more creative than the non-dyslexic population, but parents who use the word "dyslexic" don't have to apologize for it.

    My favorite resources for giftedness:
    A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children, Webb, et al - absolute must read
    Living with Intensity, Daniels & Piechowski - if you need to understand how your kid is wired differently
    Hoagies' - already mentioned - Hoagies' Gifted Education Page - one stop online guide
    Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted - SENG - to help you understand your child's emotional life
    I wrote about a bunch of topics concerning gifted kids at the National Gifted Children Examiner until recently - Suki Wessling - National gifted children Examiner - Parenting Issues | Examiner.com - lots of links there

    I have just started a page with links to all my favorite resources here: Gifted links – Avant Parenting

    Homeschooling gifted kids can be incredibly fun and incredibly challenging. We have very few peaceful days at our house. But it's worth it!

    Suki
    Suki Wessling
    http://sukiwessling.com
    For new homeschoolers: From School to Homeschool
    Forthcoming chapter book: Hanna, Homeschooler

  10. #19

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    I understand the hesitation, as we don't discuss that part of our daughter with too many people.... it's complicated. I didn't see this web address above but forgive it already said. Hoagies' Gifted Education Page is a good resource to find out things on many topics "gifted". I would also say, nurture his loves and make sure he's exposed to other things as well and you can't go wrong!

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by WindSong View Post
    I highly recommend that you look into Project Based Learning as described by Lori Pickert at her website, Project-Based Homeschooling.
    Windsong - thanks so much for this link! This is pretty much what we do and i am just winging it....I'm ordering her book tonight!
    DD, 8...8? how did that happen?

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