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Thread: Kindergarten Homeschool Curriculum

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    Default Kindergarten Homeschool Curriculum

    I am looking for a fun, hands on, kindergarten curriculum. I have two children soon to be 4 and 5 that I have homeschooled the for the last 8 months. We have used Hooked on Phonics and Math in Focus for kindergarten for both children. My son who will be five this month is reading Bob Books, HOP, and Zac the Rat (the first 3 or 4 books in each set). However, my son cannot write or count very well. My daughter who will be four this month writes very well and is starting to read cvc words. I was hoping to find a boxed curriculum that had daily lesson plans. Although my children are doing well (so far) my husband said I am to 'unorganized' and need a lesson plan. I feel my son needs alot of math manipulatives. I was hoping that someone had some suggestions. What I have found so far is Timberdoodle and Calvert. Timberdoole looks like alot of fun and hands on but unfortunately it is christian based and Calvert doesn't look very hands on. Also, I'm concerned that they will teach down to the children. I was also hoping to find a kindergarten computer program that they could use just for a supplement. Thank you guys ahead of time for you input.

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    Senior Member Evolved wife&mommy's Avatar
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    Have you looked into Moving Beyond the Page? It might work for you, that is what we use. We really like it. You'd just have to add in math when you are ready. They recommend Right Start math but we use Math Mammoth.
    Mama to 2 kids, DS(7.5) and DD(5)

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    My son was in Kindergarten this year and we used MBTP 5-7, Singapore Math, HWOT, ETC, lots of readers from the library and the Let's Read and Find Out science books. All of those have work great for us. For supplement, Brain pop Jr. is nice for a visual approach to any subject. Good Luck!
    Autumn
    Mother to three boys, my big supportive dh and a six and eight year old.

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    Senior Member Evolved dragonfly's Avatar
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    It's been a long time since kindergarten, but I never felt like Calvert "talked down" to my son. I'm not sure what you mean by lots of hands on...do you mean lots of projects and activities? Worksheets, no worksheets?

    Calvert math is mostly workbook based in the early grades, but some manipulatives are included. They also sell an optional kit of math manipulatives separately.

    I remember doing a lot of crafty stuff, cutting and pasting, art, some singing, games, read-alouds, etc. in kindergarten. The schedule called for about an hour to an hour and a half of work each day. The curriculum has changed a bit since I used it in 2002, however. There is a fairly active yahoo group that you could join. I'm sure there are people there who are using, or recently used K and could help you out.

    There's also Oak Meadow. Some people don't care for their Waldorf-y curriculum, but I mention it because it is a secular boxed curriculum.
    Kara

    Mom to one, 17 year old son.

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    Did you know Starfall has a kindergarten curriculum. Pricey but I found that anything well laid out, hands on, and fun cost. Here is the link:

    http://www.starfall.com/n/N-info/curriculum.htm

    I am currently homeschooling a kindergartener myself. I went with a well laid out phonics and handwriting program called Go Phonics. It come with 50 games plus lots other fun things to do. It has a very unique way of teaching handwriting that works.

    I am a second year homeschooler and I found much success w/ using Math U See with my oldest. I wrote a review on another site. Here is the link:
    http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/rev...ws.aspx?id=158
    I'm kccarter

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    When I say "talked down" I mean not grade appropriate. While looking at some kindergarten curriculum I found some that have them learning shapes and colors which I believe to be a preschool or pre-k level. Also, what I view as hands on is activities, manipulatives, games, etc. I like to think of workbooks as supplements to what is learned during the activities not the other way around. I wonder if I choose Calvert if Hands on Standards kindergarten math would be a good supplement. It is such a hard decision to make and a costly one if it does not work for us. Especially because we have to buy two sets of each non-reusable workbooks. Thank you every one for your input!
    RusticBliss likes this.

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    Senior Member Evolved dragonfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by katherine.galvin View Post
    When I say "talked down" I mean not grade appropriate. While looking at some kindergarten curriculum I found some that have them learning shapes and colors which I believe to be a preschool or pre-k level. Also, what I view as hands on is activities, manipulatives, games, etc. I like to think of workbooks as supplements to what is learned during the activities not the other way around. I wonder if I choose Calvert if Hands on Standards kindergarten math would be a good supplement. It is such a hard decision to make and a costly one if it does not work for us. Especially because we have to buy two sets of each non-reusable workbooks. Thank you every one for your input!
    Ah. Well, Calvert has a placement test, and wonderful Education Counselors available who will help make sure the child is placed in the appropriate grade level. I think you'd really benefit from asking about the current K program on the Calvert yahoo group. They tend to be fairly chatty, and I'm sure would be happy to let you know what a typical day/week's schedule includes for activities. Did you look at the sample pages on their website? You can see a few pages of all the books and manuals.

    They also offer some financial aid for qualifying families, and I think they have a sibling discount...at least they used to...not sure about that, but it's worth asking about.
    Kara

    Mom to one, 17 year old son.

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    Member Enlightened bailbrae's Avatar
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    We used Time4Learning when my son was in K and he loved it. Actually went through it twice, lol. We supplemented with handwriting worksheets and he helped (by helped I mean he hung out and did his own version, lol) his older brother with art projects, science experiments, that kinda thing.

    While we used T4L as our main core program, many families use it as a supplement. You may also want to check out sites where they can play online, but reinforce educational concepts...LearningGamesforKids is a good one.

    Good luck! Kindergarten was such a fun age...
    Katie ~
    "Anti-June Cleaver" Mom of 2 boys,
    Gadget Junkie Extraordinaire.
    Visit with me @ You. Me. Us.

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    Box curricula have to assume that a child is coming in without any knowledge really. Some will move fast and do more. Others will stay slow. Oak Meadow is an example of one that will keep it gentle. Calvert is one that will go faster. However, if you want a program that's more tailored for your kid, you have to buy something that's not a box curriculum. It is still a curriculum though.

    For K, your subject list will look something like this:

    Phonics - look at Explode the Code, Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading, Reading Reflex, Starfall... or just stick with HOP and BOB books, which is a fine duo
    Handwriting - look at Handwriting Without Tears or Zaner-Blosser
    Literature - consider just reading books, or, if you must, look at the FIAR and Peak with Books lists, which also cover social studies and science and other topics
    Math - look at Miquon Math, MEP Reception level,
    Social Studies - look at Elemental History's Adventures in America,
    Science - look at Elemental Science, Mudpies and Magnets, or Science is Simple
    Art - consider just having art materials and coloring sheets and doing some museum trips, or look at Artistic Pursuits or consider doing Draw Write Now for handwriting and drawing
    Disclaimer: Everything I'm saying is just my own opinion, based on my own experiences teaching and with my own kids and my own life. You should just ignore me if I'm annoying you. I don't mind.

    But if I don't annoy you, feel free to visit my blog:
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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    So I ended up buying the Calvert Kindergarten curriculum like new on ebay for $400 which I believe is $365 cheaper than their website. Although I will not be able to use their typing curriculum which I feel is not a big loss. Calvert does seem much behind my son's level (especially in math) but I like to start at the beginning. Also, what I have done in the past is use a page protector and dry erase marker for so both kids could use the same work book (and I can resale it with no marks). Also, do the page over and over until the subject is mastered. I also am going to buy Hands on Standards math and science for kindergarten (with the math manipulatives). I am also buying Angel Bear Yoga lesson guide and audio book with cd. I will repost in a couple weeks to tell you what I think when it comes.

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