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  1. #1
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    Default History for 1st Grade - Need Suggestions

    I have been looking for a 1st grade History curriculum for a while and still cannot find one that I am happy with. I see that most people use Story of the World but I am not a fan of it. We are looking for something structured. I do not want to spend a ton of money (looked at Sonlight but its like $100 without half the stuff you need). Any suggestions would be great. I looked at our states standards and they just teach about the community so I don't think that would be a good idea. I like the idea of lapbooks but I really need a walkthrough idea as this is my 1st year.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
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    Well, my response goes back to that "community" thing that you don't want. LOL
    Here is a very nice essay on why we use that philosophy in our house.
    http://www.movingbeyondthepage.com/article8.asp
    Teri
    Joseph (5/00), Libby (10/01), Caroline (9/02) and Alex (4/89)
    My Blog

  3. #3
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    I have been looking at the History Pocket series, such as Native Americans and Life in Plymouth. I like the way it lays everything out but I am not sure if its enough. I thought maybe we could do a pocket a semester or something??

    Teri, we thought that we could teach about Social Studies by actually getting out in the community,etc. However, I was thinking that if I could not find a history curriculum I liked I would go with Social Studies Made Simple Grade 1, since it seems to match what the State Standards. Thank you for the article.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Arrived pandahoneybee's Avatar
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    HI~
    We did a lite history in 1st Grade, but we did do a series on DVD called Liberty's Kids
    , they also have a website with games, etc. I just built our lessons around it Most of the 1st grade history is a general intro in America and the world.
    We also did the Story of the World towards the end of 1st grade.
    Hope this helps!
    Pandahoneybee -
    Homeschooling two boys (17 and 12),3 dogs, 3 fish, 2 goats, 2 guineas and one grown man in NC since 2008! AND proud mama has 6 Rhode Island Red girls!!
    my personal blog
    http://pandahoneybeeshomeschoolingad....blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Senior Member Arrived hockeymom's Avatar
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    I thought that was an interesting article, although I fully disagree with it. My son (7) is fascinated with history and geography (the world at large, as opposed to just our own little community) and always has been. He has an innate understanding that there is a huge world outside of our town (and did long before we moved internationally when he was 5) and that things we can't comprehend happened long before he existed, or Mommy, or his Granddaddy even (hello dinosaurs!)). Maybe it helps that we've always traveled with him or that we've never simplified ideas to him, or maybe it's just the little person he is (that's what I truly believe), but he gets it, and he always has (in ways that often make our jaws drop).

    Anyway, to give the blanket statement "kids can't understand" irks me like nothing else can. In kindergarten and grade 1 his class was told, very clearly, "Children can't learn to spell correctly. They should use kid spelling instead of adult spelling. Because they can't do it yet." He was also told in kindergarten, "You can't read yet. You are only 5". So, I sent him with a book to read to his class, and finally his teacher stopped telling him "you can't". Is telling our children "you can't" helping them reach their potential?

    Every child is different and every family is different, and we should celebrate that fact. But to say "you can't" doesn't do service to the little people in our lives, or to any of us. I know I've spent an awful lot of my time thinking "I can't" when, in fact, I can.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
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    Every child is different and every family is different, and we should celebrate that fact. But to say "you can't" doesn't do service to the little people in our lives, or to any of us. I know I've spent an awful lot of my time thinking "I can't" when, in fact, I can.
    I think that sums it up very nicely and I don't believe anyone said that anyone couldn't do anything. I am not sure where that is coming from.
    I am very much of the constructionist theory and while kids can totally dig dinosaurs and Egyptians, and we certainly have read about them at that age, studying their own environment and community was much more appropriate for my kids than learning about wars and the destruction that humans can do.
    This year we have WWII, so it certainly happens quickly enough.
    Teri
    Joseph (5/00), Libby (10/01), Caroline (9/02) and Alex (4/89)
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  7. #7
    Member Regular Closeacademy's Avatar
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    You could use something like this as a jumping off point: http://missbarbara.net/greatlessons.html Then you could follow up with an Ancient Egypt lapbook, an Ancient Greece Lapbook complimented by something like Usborne's Greek Myths for Young Children (my dds loved it at that age), an Ancient Rome lapbook and finish it off with Ancient China.

    I loved the first Story of the World but the rest were just too much war when they could have focused so much more on the building of society and the world.

    Just an idea.
    Christy

    2nd grade: Oak Meadow, Singapore Math, Lapbooks

    4th grade: Oak Meadow, Singapore Math, Spell to Write and Read, Lively Latin, Lapbooks

    http://Closeacademy.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member Arrived hockeymom's Avatar
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    I didn't mean to rant, but that's how I took the article." History is an abstract concept that cognitive psychologists tell us is difficult for young children to comprehend", "Emphasizing ancient cultures presents children with content that is beyond their ability to comprehend", "Could a bright five year old memorize the parts of a cell and their functions? – Yes.Would he enjoy looking in a microscope at onion cells? – Of course he would.Would either of these things have any meaningful significance before he understands that plants and animals grow, change, and have needs that must be met? – Probably not.", etc. If we don't teach it to them, if we don't show them, how can see beyond their immediate lives and their immediate communities? I don't mean to imply that learning about our communities isn't important, but I do know that if that's all my son ever got to learn about he'd be bored to tears--and he'd know he was missing out on so much. That said, I don't dwell on wars either, but I don't avoid them either now that he is in a place when I feel they are developmentally appropriate.

    I apologize if I came off sounding like a crazy person; I think because of hearing all the "you can'ts" lately I'm a little sensitive. It's the blanket statements that I have a hard time with, not the fact that kids learn at different levels and in different ways, or have different interests. No offense meant, and I hope none taken.

  9. #9
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    There are many options for history this early. Although most of them I love are literature rich. Sonlight & Beautiful Feet Books. My older sons really enjoyed Calverts A Child's History of the World. They have a workbook with it, you can buy is seperate from the whole curriculum ( there used to be the course on CD, don't know if it is anymore. My boys really liked that ). If you are Atheist or strongly against religion you might want to skip the first chapter. Other than that I don't remember anything objectionable. I will purchase it again for these little ones.

    I enjoy SOTW, but use a combination of Beautiful Feet Books ( bfbooks.com ), Sonlight ( they carry A Child's History of the World, but not the workbook ), and TWTM. I know I overdo history a bit. I hated it in school, the texts were so dry. I want my children to love history and use great literature help them.

    If you like Sonlight you can most likely just get most of the books at half price, or at the library. Then just read through history using Usborne World History as a spine ? Beautiful Feet is the same, you can just buy the guide ?

    I know many people who don't start history till middle school. They just don't feel it is important in the early years, as they don't feel kids retain much of it.

  10. #10
    schwartzkari
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    My daughter is starting 1st grade (tomorrow actually, lol, her idea, not mine )

    For History, we are using a book entitled "How Children Lived: A First Book of History" and it is basically a tour of the world, going back in time and visiting children who lived in Ancient Eqypt all the way to America in the 1920s. We are going to do History twice a month. During our tours in the book, we are going to research what types of foods the children ate and then attempt to make the recipes in our kitchen. I wanted to keep History fun and very simple at such a young age. There will be plenty of time to delve into more complex history issues.

    Maybe you could try creating your own lesson plan for History or possibly pick one subject of interest and do a unit study on that.

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