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  1. #11

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    Thanks a lot for your detailed answer, my eldest wants to be challenged in maths so I'm thinking of going with Singapore maths.
    For younger I am liking both MM and beast academy. Actually confused between both, she wants fun and challenging...else she is complaining it's too easy...I am looking into all the links that you have mentioned.

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saadia View Post
    Thanks a lot for your detailed answer, my eldest wants to be challenged in maths so I'm thinking of going with Singapore maths.
    For younger I am liking both MM and beast academy. Actually confused between both, she wants fun and challenging...else she is complaining it's too easy...I am looking into all the links that you have mentioned.
    If you are looking for a challenging math, use Beast Academy. It is fun, yet very challenging.There are comic books to explain the concepts and worksheet book to work through the problems. They also offer challenging math puzzles and games to play. I highly recommend it.

    Note there is an online version and a book version. We use the book version.
    A mama, who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.
    I also share free and low-cost educational resources at
    http://chooseourownadventures.blogspot.com

  4. #13

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    I would also add that Mosdos does have spelling in it, they have a variety of activities in the workbook and it does have some spelling and vocabulary. So you might not need spelling u see - also as far as I can tell spelling u see is copywork so there are many options for copywork including just picking passages out of books that you pick. If you aren't feeling comfortable with that yet, then I would think about Bravewriter - The Arrow section allows you to use the books and passages they pick and then the spelling and grammar comes out of those passages. It is all guided.

    I also really liked First Language Lessons from the Well-trained mind for grammar and you could use it for both children. It definitely helped make grammar stick for my kids and they all enjoyed the sort of call and respond and write nature of it. I know this is overwhelming and I asked so many questions on this site. As time goes on, you get much more comfortable with using less and less curriculum, so just keep asking.

    Also MBTP includes grammar and vocabulary if you choose to go that route. I love MBTP, but never bought for the year because I knew that it would be way too much. I would pick a book and a history to go along with it and that always worked very well for us and was cheaper because I would get many of the books from the library. Their guides are always very well done.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  5. #14

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    Thanks HawaiiGeek and Mariam, I was also thinking about omitting SpellingYouSee. This year with Calvert's new curriculum I felt she is missing a lot in spellings and grammar.But I'm excited about Mosdos and First Language Lessons.
    I will definitely try Beast Academy specially for my first grader (for next year).
    Last edited by Saadia; 12-28-2018 at 07:14 PM.

  6. #15

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    Which grammar program is less teacher intensive and not very cumbersome? I was inclined towards first language lessons but now considering fix it grammar, then there is easy grammar also. What are pros and cons of all three?
    And what's the best age/ grade to start any of these formal grammar courses?can I do same level of anyone with both 2nd grade n 4th grader?
    My 3rd grader started school earlier this year and will soon finish it so planning to get some stuff started slowly.

  7. #16

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    I do grammar really informally in elementary school. We point out parts of speech in writing and spelling lessons. We observe sentence structure in our reading and copywork. We focus on one topic at a time that needs help in their own writing. We correct spoken grammar (verb agreement and such) from the time they are speaking well enough to be gently corrected, usually around age 3 for a child without speech issues.

    Once they get to middle school, then I do a formal grammar program. My favorite is Analytical Grammar Jr. in 5th or 6th grade and then Analytical Grammar in junior high or high school.

  8. #17

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    You may not need formal grammar beyond writing more detailed and organized “essays” and reports. My older son 7th grade now - we gave up on busywork worksheets and he still seems to speak and write in standard English.
    My younger son has been in speech therapy since he was 2, he will likely get grammar because his speaking is non-standard. He’s in first grade now, and I cant imagine starting grammar lessons until he has figured out the whole speaking thing.

    Try MadLibs if you want to teach parts of speech... not that calling something and adjective or adverb really helps for elementary kids, but it may make you feel better that they know colors are adjectives, and libraries and tables are nouns.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saadia View Post
    Which grammar program is less teacher intensive and not very cumbersome? I was inclined towards first language lessons but now considering fix it grammar, then there is easy grammar also. What are pros and cons of all three?
    And what's the best age/ grade to start any of these formal grammar courses?can I do same level of anyone with both 2nd grade n 4th grader?
    My 3rd grader started school earlier this year and will soon finish it so planning to get some stuff started slowly.
    Check out the Language Smarts workbooks from Critical Thinking. They are not very labor intensive at all and clearly explain things. I find some of the worksheets repetitive, but I just skip what I don't want to do.
    A mama, who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.
    I also share free and low-cost educational resources at
    http://chooseourownadventures.blogspot.com

  10. #19

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    Thank you so much for releasing such a big burden off my shoulders of teaching kids an extra course. I have seen so many people doing grammar with their early elementary kids so thought it might be necessary other than that I think my daughter is doing pretty good in her writing n speaking.

  11. #20

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    My 3rd grader has problems to comprehend word problems, any suggestions to improve her on word problems?
    Also thinking of starting math mammoth after finishing her 3rd grade MIF. Should I start with grade 3 or grade 4?
    I just came across 40% sale on MM at homeschool buyer's co-op. Thinking of buying it for grades 1-7 but which package to buy light blue only or everything?

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