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  1. #11

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    I guess, all of my dinners are 'lazy' dinners, because I do not even attempt anything that takes more than 20-30 min of my direct time ever since my first child was born.

    - grilled/broiled hamburgers/cheeseburgers with a salad
    - grilled/broiled steak or pork chops with a salad
    - grilled broiled salmon/halibut/tuna with a salad
    - rotisserie chicken - home-made or store-bought with roasted potatoes
    - roasted chicken legs/thighs with roasted potatoes
    - stir-fry with whatever combination of meats and veggies I have
    - sauteed sausage and whatever veggies I have
    - lemon-butter-garlic shrimp or white fish
    - chili and chili-like combinations of meats, beans and veggies
    - curry-like creations from meat/fish and veggies

    Worse-case scenario - cheesy noodles or buttery wild rice for kids and frozen meatballs or spoonfuls of peanut butter for myself.

    ...and loads of fruits/berries.

    P.S. We prefer to stay low carb, so meats/fish/veggies/fruits are our main options.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

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  3. #12

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    Popcorn is a meal at our house. So's toast.

    I believe completely in the theory that meals can be skipped, so if we don't have time for honest food, we can always put popcorn kernels in the popper or bread in the toaster. Then you can forage for fruit or yogurt later.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  4. #13
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Stir fry! I put sesame oil in the large wok-size skillet I have, and throw in whatever we happen to have on hand. If the meat is frozen or uncooked, I start with it and add some broth into the skillet and cook the meat for about 15 mins or so until mostly cooked through. Then comes the veggies. Little more sesame oil or olive oil, and then whatever veggies are in the crisper go into the skillet. Celery, thinly sliced carrots, onion, asparagus, fennel...just whatever is on hand. Of course, seasoning with s&p and my favorite garlic and herb mix as it cooks. If I feel like boiling some rice while this is happening, then we have rice, if not, just serve it with chunks of bread. Supper is usually ready in 20-25 mins this way.


  5. #14
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oksana View Post
    I guess, all of my dinners are 'lazy' dinners, because I do not even attempt anything that takes more than 20-30 min of my direct time ever since my first child was born.

    - grilled/broiled hamburgers/cheeseburgers with a salad
    - grilled/broiled steak or pork chops with a salad
    - grilled broiled salmon/halibut/tuna with a salad
    - rotisserie chicken - home-made or store-bought with roasted potatoes
    - roasted chicken legs/thighs with roasted potatoes
    - stir-fry with whatever combination of meats and veggies I have
    - sauteed sausage and whatever veggies I have
    - lemon-butter-garlic shrimp or white fish
    - chili and chili-like combinations of meats, beans and veggies
    - curry-like creations from meat/fish and veggies

    Worse-case scenario - cheesy noodles or buttery wild rice for kids and frozen meatballs or spoonfuls of peanut butter for myself.

    ...and loads of fruits/berries.

    P.S. We prefer to stay low carb, so meats/fish/veggies/fruits are our main options.
    This is pretty much exactly how we eat - except no shrimp because DH is allergic. No cooking cooking. Lol. If it takes longer than 25 minutes we're not going to eat it.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  6. #15

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    Thanks to you guys, I have just purchased an instant pot, which I hadn't even heard of.

  7. #16

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    In actual answer to your "I'm not cooking" question....Cereal (Cheerios or SpecialK). If they get freeze dried strawberries or they feel like peeling a banana, I call it balanced.
    Quick cook...Egg McMuffin-style homemade sandwiches.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  8. #17

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    Tortillas get a LOT of play in these situations here. They're great for whipping up quick: cheese quesadillas (with or without chicken, olives, and/or tomatoes), fish stick "tacos" with lettuce, PB&strawberry wraps, egg/cheese/ham/bacon/"fake"on/sausage/"faux"sage wraps, hot dogs in a blanket.

    Instant oatmeal or Cream of Wheat, with fruit and hard-boiled eggs or Morningstar proteins.

    My eldest (12) can whip up tuna salad or nuked omelettes (he's still a little freaked out re:the gas range, not that I blame him), which is great if I'm sick and the husband isn't around.

  9. #18

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    This has provided some much need inspiration right now.
    A mama, who teaches college writing, as well as help her 10-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.
    I also share free and low-cost educational resources at
    http://chooseourownadventures.blogspot.com

  10. #19

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    My husband prepared grilled king fished with butter & lemon. We also ordered pizza for our girls.

  11. #20

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    Even gluten-free, dairy-free, corn-free eating can be done slackerly! We had a weeklong power outtage recently, and I discovered a new depth of scraping together food they could all eat, out of things that require little or no prep!

    Simply Lays are too salty for my taste, but at potatoes, salt, and sunflower oil, are on the menu as a starch.
    Canned plain vegetables like green beans, kidney beans, and spinach, are fine in a pinch, when you have no power. When you have power, frozen are even better.

    Natural Peanut butter and bananas make a good breakfast. If you have power, you can mash them together and microwave them into insta-cake. Add cacao powder and you have 3-ingredient insta-browie-in-a-mug, which happens to be loaded with potassium, protein, fiber-rich carbs, healthy fats, and magnesium from the cacao.

    There is nothing wrong with pouring hot water into instant mashed potatoes and stirring canned vegetables and leftover meat into it, and eating it out of a bowl. With ketchup if it makes it taste better.

    And raw broccoli is crunchy, and if dipped in mustard with sugar or honey stirred in, becomes a "snack tray" to munch on. Can also do that with any raw veg in the fridge: cauliflower, carrots, cukes...I can tell the kids "Prep a veggie tray with dip!" and they can do it on their own. Then they all tend to eat more veg than they would otherwise because competition creeps in, when it's a communal plate.

    That power outtage helped me lower my standards and see that we all survived. Previously, the "I don't want to cook" dinner was usually leftovers from my deliberately making a hot "double lunch" with the intention of having instant-reheat dinner made ahead of time, with the same effort that lunch took.

    But now? I have learned that if necessary, everyone can live on oatmeal, apples dipped in peanut butter, and a bag of potato chips, for dinner. Or else a bowl full of chopped lettuce onto which canned drained kidney beans are dumped, along with whatever toppings each person wants or can have, which might be cheese, sliced avocado if we have avocados, salsa, sunflower seeds, leftover sliced cold meat, or other veg like tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, spinach leaves, you name it. Whatever we have that sounds good.

    I try to keep something in the fridge like cooked rice or boiled potatoes, to build a quick one-skillet or one-bowl meal from, and always save meat juice for soup base.
    That way, when I have more leftovers than anything else in the fridge, usually by the end of the week, it all goes into the soup pot along with all reserved meat broths, and we have Soup For Dinner, sometimes with rice or rice noodles in it.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

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What are your "Im not cooking dinner" dinners?