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zette
04-12-2011, 05:45 PM
I bought Happy Phonics, and was disappointed that it looks like most of the fun games start after you have the basic letter sounds down. For learning the letter sounds, she recommends an egg carton game that my DS wasn't into, and also has a stack of flash cards with all the letters (and later combinations like "oo" and "sh").

Any ideas on how to make going through the flash cards more interesting?

dbmamaz
04-12-2011, 07:21 PM
How old is your daughter? I've always taught my kids the basic letter sounds using objects around the house, all day long. B-b-belly . . . belly starts with a b! and tickle her! Pick a letter and think of lots of words that start with it .. . while you are in the grocery store, or the car, or taking a walk. Get foam alphabet letters for the bathtub.

pansypower
04-12-2011, 07:59 PM
My kids used a song to learn their letter sounds. It was an easy one...

A is apple Ah Ah Ah

B is for baby Ba Ba Ba

and so on.... clapping with the songs and a little dancing.
this is a good daily ritual in addition to pointing out letter sounds all day.

hockeymom
04-12-2011, 08:05 PM
I'll say it before anyone else does...LeapFrog. And reading, reading, reading. And talking. And playing.

I can't really imagine making flash cards interesting to that age group (or any, really), especially when there are so many other ways of teaching letter sounds.

zette
04-13-2011, 02:20 AM
The problem with using objects around the house is that I want to pair the visual of the letter (or combo) with the sound. Seems like there ought to be some way to use board games we already have (CandyLand, Chutes & Ladders), but change the rules so that if you get the sound right you get to advance...

Busygoddess
04-13-2011, 06:42 AM
My dd loved playing games with flashcards as a toddler & preschooler. We would play matching games, make a maze of flashcards around the house, etc. We'd spread the cards out on the floor, I'd say a letter or sound (or word, or whatever we were focusing on) or flip over a card (if we were doing a matching game) and she'd hop, skip, Frankenstein walk, crab walk, etc to the correct card (she has ADHD so our games were always really active). We used flashcard games for letters, colors, shapes, all kinds of stuff. Of course we also read together, watched the Leap Frog dvds, I talked to her all the time (like an adult, never using baby talk or dumbing down words), etc. It worked for us.

dbmamaz
04-13-2011, 11:01 AM
Zette, dont you have any alphabet books? I"m pretty sure I owned at least three for each kid. Dr Seuss makes one, you can often find them in themes for whatever your kid is interested in. I also put a few word labels around the house at times - the mostly on their dressor, word and picture, to help them learn to put their own clothes away. And you can also use alphabet blocks - they actually have pictures of words that start w the letter on the block along w the letter, and last I looked I think they were $10 at walmart. In fact, toy stores are really chock full of phonics/alphabet toys, if i recall.

kcanders
04-13-2011, 11:27 AM
You could also check out leapfrog games. We had one when Maddie was younger...I don't remember it exactly but there were letters and sounds to learn. We also got a leapfrog go fish game (I think it was in a pack of several leapfrog card/matching games) Maddie loved that. We would always say the sounds when we asked for the cards. Do you have mmm for map? etc.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
04-13-2011, 05:07 PM
Electric Company!!!! My kids love the original series from the '70's.

farrarwilliams
04-13-2011, 09:43 PM
My kids learned the basic letter sounds mostly from media at age 3 to 4.5 or so. Electric Company, Word World, Starfall, Poisson Rouge, PBSkids.org... I mean, I know we played little games and like Cara said, we were just constantly saying words and looking at words and pointing out sounds. But I didn't do any formal teaching for it. By the time we started trying to learn to read at age 5, they already knew most of the sounds and it was more just me reminding them.

wife&mommy
04-14-2011, 11:36 PM
My kids learned the basic letter sounds mostly from media at age 3 to 4.5 or so. Electric Company, Word World, Starfall, Poisson Rouge, PBSkids.org... I mean, I know we played little games and like Cara said, we were just constantly saying words and looking at words and pointing out sounds. But I didn't do any formal teaching for it. By the time we started trying to learn to read at age 5, they already knew most of the sounds and it was more just me reminding them.

This was us, too.

Accidental Homeschooler
04-15-2011, 10:49 AM
I just did flash cards yesterday with my 5yo, all the 2 and 3 letter words she has learned from Ordinary Parents Guide. She was pretty grudgingly doing it until I started screaming and waving my arms everytime she got one right. Basically I acted like a lunatic and I guess that made it fun for her. The fact that it was clearly annoying her older sister added to her enjoyment also.

dbmamaz
04-15-2011, 11:16 AM
actually there was a very brief time when i used flashcards w my son - sight words, tho. But every time he got one right, I had to add a block to my stack, and if he got it wrong, he had to add a block to his stack. I always made sure he knew most of the words in the deck already . . . so if my stack fell over first, i lost - he LOVED that!

pansypower
04-18-2011, 10:14 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Letter-Words-Flash-Kids-Cards/dp/141149962X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1303132347&sr=8-1

I recently bought these for my son and he loved them. He enjoys puzzles and building so he likes putting the words together.

Teri
04-18-2011, 10:18 AM
My kids learned the basic letter sounds mostly from media at age 3 to 4.5 or so. Electric Company, Word World, Starfall, Poisson Rouge, PBSkids.org... I mean, I know we played little games and like Cara said, we were just constantly saying words and looking at words and pointing out sounds. But I didn't do any formal teaching for it. By the time we started trying to learn to read at age 5, they already knew most of the sounds and it was more just me reminding them.

This was us, also (with the exception of the daughter with dyslexia...it didn't work for her which led me to think she had something going on, which she did!)