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View Full Version : Weekly Poll: What do you think of your state's/country's homeschooling laws?



Topsy
03-02-2011, 03:59 PM
(Thanks to dbmamaz for this one!)

I live in North Carolina, and I guess we are sort of a moderately regulated state where homeschooling is concerned. Some people say they find the laws here quite restrictive, but except for the requirement to do a yearly standardized test, I have never really felt that way. NC makes lots of "suggestions" about how to do things, but they certainly don't enforce many of them, so I feel fairly good about the laws here.

What about you? Are you a lover or a hater concerning the homeschooling laws in your state or country of residence?

lynne
03-02-2011, 04:08 PM
I'm in NC too and I checked "minimal homeschooling laws" because, like you said the standardized test is the main thing, which is easy enough and I'm interested to see how my kids do on them.

Riceball_Mommy
03-02-2011, 04:40 PM
I had to choose other because Maryland's laws aren't super strict and so far I've had an easy time with the reviews (only had one review though). It drives me crazy that the law is a bit vague, so if you interpret it differently then the reviewer then you might get into trouble. I mean what shows regular thorough instruction to you may be lacking or too much someone else. So anyway so far I really don't hate it and I like the idea of the review, but I can't say I love the actual process.

Teri
03-02-2011, 04:55 PM
As a Texan, we are among the least restrictive states. We are considered a "private school" and the state does not regulate private schools. We do not have to even inform anyone that we are homeschooling, so Texas is one of those states that has NO idea how many homeschoolers there are. They do not try to account for the kids that are not in public schools.
We do no standardized testing, have no requirements on attendance and report to no one.
On the flip side, we get no support from the state, we can access no services at the schools (with the exception of a FEW special education services), we cannot participate in extracurriculars at the schools (music, sports, etc.). We get no assistance in buying curriculum or anything else.
I am just happy as can be to have it stay the way it is.

inmom
03-02-2011, 05:05 PM
As a Texan, we are among the least restrictive states. We are considered a "private school" and the state does not regulate private schools. We do not have to even inform anyone that we are homeschooling, so Texas is one of those states that has NO idea how many homeschoolers there are. They do not try to account for the kids that are not in public schools.
We do no standardized testing, have no requirements on attendance and report to no one.
On the flip side, we get no support from the state, we can access no services at the schools (with the exception of a FEW special education services), we cannot participate in extracurriculars at the schools (music, sports, etc.). We get no assistance in buying curriculum or anything else.
I am just happy as can be to have it stay the way it is.

That is essentially the way it is in Indiana. Theoretically IF someone from the department of ed came to my house, the only "proof" I'd have to show them is a calendar of some sort showing my kids were "in attendance" for 180 days. We are also considered private schools, and can determine what, where, when, and how the kids learn. No standardized testing either.

Stella M
03-02-2011, 05:10 PM
Somewhat restrictive but I tolerate it.

We have to register as homeschoolers, which involves writing a program for each child and being visited by an Authorised Person, who assesses your homeschooling plans for the next few years, theoretically checks that you did what you said you were going to from the last visit - I normally have a pile of books/portfolios sitting there for them to look at but they never do! - and gives a period of registration for up to 2 years. It's a pain in the neck sometimes but not really onerous. I've never had a problem with getting the 2 years registration. There's no testing. We're supposed to follow the curriculum but not the syllabus, so as long as you cover the key learning areas, there's no problem. I've registered with an unschooling program at one point and that was OK too. Probably depends on who your AP is though.

I tolerate it because I can accept that the state has some right to make sure that all children are receiving a basic education. I wouldn't want it to become any more prescriptive than it is now though.

farrarwilliams
03-02-2011, 06:09 PM
I wavered but ended up picking other. Until a couple of years ago, DC (which is neither a state nor a country, btw ;) ) had no homeschool law at all. Then, there was a terrible case where a mother murdered her children and used homeschooling to cover up the fact that they weren't in school (truly, it was a gruesome and tragic case). So they proposed a really crazy homeschool law - similar to the one recently tabled in IL, which would give the OSSE the authority to just barge into your house and inspect it whenever they wanted (um, hello, school board, can you say "unconstitutional"?). That didn't pass and instead we got a law that required us to register, parents to have hs diplomas or GEDs, that we teach all the subjects, etc. Also, that we must keep "a portfolio of materials" and that they can request a review of those materials at a mutually agreeable location up to twice a year (I think that's how often - it might have been three times?). Anyway, that was three years ago and as far as I know NO ONE has ever actually been reviewed. The homeschool "office" is one single person and dealing with the homeschoolers is only a part of her job, as I understand it.

So, in practice, minimal regulation, that's for sure. But the law is so new and so vague. I feel like they could easily decide to enforce it very arbitrarily and I'm not happy with the checks and balances and means of appeal that are built into the law. There's not a long history of what a "review" would mean or look like, such as in Maryland. Overall, it's completely not a hassle for me, but I do worry about the future.

dbmamaz
03-02-2011, 07:37 PM
I said somewhat/tolerate.

When we first start homeschooling, we have to show that we are qualified to teach - either a high school diploma or a letter stating why you are qualified - that letter is mostly supposed to show that you are motivated and literate.

Then each year you have to send in something stating the childs name and birth date (I think birth date is required) and a curriclum description - most counties will allow it to be fairly generalized. I think I did 3 sentences for each kid. You do send it to the superintendant of the school district, and some districts are more freindly to home schoolers, and other go out of their way to intimidate them. Often the districts who are trying to intimidate are also using an older, out-dated version of the home school provision in the law. The law has been made less onerous a few times in the past decade or so.

anyways, at the end of the year we have to show proof of progress. This can be a nationally normed test where your child performs at least 24th percentile, or an evaluation by a teacher lisenced in any state, or, if your district allows, you can send in a portfolio for them to evaluate. Most dont have the time and wont accept them. The evaluators are not bound legally on how to evaluate the kids - many people rave about the evaluators who just make them feel great about home schooling their kids. I have done the tests so far, because there is one which costs only 25/kid and you can give at home - very simple.

dottieanna29
03-02-2011, 08:15 PM
As a Texan, we are among the least restrictive states. We are considered a "private school" and the state does not regulate private schools. We do not have to even inform anyone that we are homeschooling, so Texas is one of those states that has NO idea how many homeschoolers there are. They do not try to account for the kids that are not in public schools.
We do no standardized testing, have no requirements on attendance and report to no one.
On the flip side, we get no support from the state, we can access no services at the schools (with the exception of a FEW special education services), we cannot participate in extracurriculars at the schools (music, sports, etc.). We get no assistance in buying curriculum or anything else.
I am just happy as can be to have it stay the way it is.

This is basically how it is handled in NJ except we are not considered private schools. We are allowed to homeschool under the same statute that allows private schools to run (something about equivalent education). No reporting, no notification, no testing but no using their resources either. I'm good with it.

outskirtsofbs
03-02-2011, 08:31 PM
Somewhere in the middle for Iowa. If I didn't have DD enrolled in the HSAP, she would be doing the testing. No problems here.
**edit** As of July 1st of 2013, Iowa now has much more lenient hs laws. I'm enjoying not having to have contact with the school district as we now have a new hs coordinator who, let's just say, is less than helpful. I'm totally grateful to have him and the state of Iowa removed from my ass.

dbmamaz
03-02-2011, 08:38 PM
Oh, I forgot - Virginia also does not allow home schooled students to participate in intermural sports, and while some school districts apparently will, in general as a state, home schoolers are not allowed to attend 'part time', home schoolers do not get access to materials of any sort, or any other support i could think of.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
03-02-2011, 08:58 PM
MA doesn't have homeschooling laws, just two or three court cases that established what a school district can and cannot require from parents. We're required to send in an "education plan" before each school year, then have the choice of standardized test, evaluation by a third party, or progress report/work samples once per year for reporting. My school district requests progress reports twice per year and a meeting at their office, but they don't push it if people decline. So, I picked "minimal laws and love it" because this doesn't feel onerous to me at all.

WindSong
03-02-2011, 09:40 PM
I'm new to hs'ing this year, but this is my understanding for NH: For the first 2 years of homeschooling in NH you must have your child's portfolio evaluated by a certified teacher OR have your child take a standardized test. The child must score at the 40th percentile for his/her grade level in order to show learning is taking place. After the second year, nothing is required. So, this sounds great to me. I must admit I am nervous about the upcoming testing even though the bar is set pretty low. I even rearranged ds's math schedule to switch from decimals to geometry when I found out that geometry was on the test. The curriculum he was using had him starting geometry towards the end of the year after the standardized test. I guess I worry just because we all want to continue hs'ing, so I'll jump through their hoops the first 2 years.

Firefly_Mom
03-03-2011, 01:33 AM
I chose "resent" because I don't like any homeschooling laws. I know - what a rebel. :D Here in Oregon, you're required to send a letter to the school district - only once, unless you change districts. Technically you're supposed to receive a letter back from them stating that they do, in fact, have you down as a homeschooler, but I've me quite a few people who've never received one - even after calling or writing several times. You're also supposed to have your child tested at the end of 3rd, 5th, 8th and 10th grades. If your child has any kind of learning issue (like dyslexia) or you feel that they are "behind" in any area, you can write a PDP for them and you don't have to test them at all. (A PDP is basically an IEP that you write up without the school's involvement.)

Truth be told, at least half of the homeschoolers we've met since moving here 4 years ago have NEVER registered their children with the state. If for some reason the district finds out, you get fined (around $120) and have a specified period of time to send in the letter to the district. With all of the school budget cuts, nobody really messes with homeschoolers. One of the upsides of a bad economy, I guess.

BrendaE
03-03-2011, 01:46 AM
I chose the somewhat restrictive and resent option as well. I am in fact pretty sure I am about to break the law. Hawaiians are supposed to register their children at the school they would be going to if they were going to PS as home schoolers. State testing is mandatory starting next year for every grade not just just the every other year they used up until now. You also have to turn in progress reports at the end of the year and if your child does not make it into the top two tiers of testing scores then they want to see your curriculum as well. I havent had any of that happen to us thankfully, but I am DONE with the govt even attempting to tell me how, when, and what to educate MY child with. MY child does NOT belong to the government. Since we have to re register if the children move schools, such as elementary to the middle, or the middle to the high school.. and my DD just moved from middle to high.. I am simply not registering her. Home schooling is so prevalent here that no one will even bother to question whyshe is home or out and about.

hockeymom
03-03-2011, 05:07 AM
Here in New Brunswick we are required to let our district know each year that we'll be homeschooling; it's basically just a form with your child's name and birthday so they can be accounted for. We don't have any testing, portfolios or evaluations to deal with, although we are supposed to teach to the "guidelines" and provide proof if requested. Technically the province does have the right to check on a child's progress, but that's only to cover themselves in a case of abuse or clear neglect. The province has no money to be rooting homeschoolers out of the hills to take a peek at what they are learning, so we are left completely alone. In our case, if there were ps services we wanted to use we would be welcome to use them--when I pulled DS out last year we were even invited to take part in all the assemblies and other events the school holds--but there isn't anything beneficial to us there to take advantage of.

kewb22
03-03-2011, 08:15 AM
Nj is an awesome state to homeschool in. If your kids are never enrolled in school there is nothing to report. If you are pulling them from school you send a letter to the Superintendent, cc the principl and go on your merry way. I always tell people "The State of NJ says: You want to homeschool. That's great. Don't let the door hit you on the way out."

oldranger68
03-03-2011, 08:32 AM
Kentucky is a really homeschool friendly state. We are considered a private school. They have the right to inspect your school and your records, which you are required to keep...attendance, core curriculum..., but even that must be arranged before hand. They have no right to just drop in on you unannounced. So far I have never been bothered.

amym
03-03-2011, 09:24 AM
I went with minimal although I think others in my state might go with somewhat restrictive. In Maine we do have to send in a letter of intent the first year and then every other year, a letter stating you are going to continue homeschooling. At the end of the year we have a portfolio review but other than saying you will cover the 3r's, a year of maine studies at some point in middle school and that your kids will be computer literate by the end of high school you can teach any way you see fit. We are also fortunate because we are allowed to enroll our kids in sports, music, art and that type of thing in the ps system. Currently I don't have plans to do that but since there are no co-ops up here it may be beneficial further down the road.
I guess I also look at it as a way to keep me focused on what I am doing and focused on the goals made when we decided to homeschool.

Vashti
03-03-2011, 09:37 AM
I selected resent. I do not appreciate the government telling me how to raise or educate my children. We have relatively minimal laws in Colorado. We're required to notify some school district in the state that we are homeschooling, not necessarily the ps where you're located, unless you are pulling your children from that school. We also have to test every other year and submit the testing for storage and eval to either the school district or a cover school. There are several cover schools in the state that will take your notification of homeschooling and your testing records and keep them for you. If your child falls behind then you have a year to bring them back up to par or force putting them in public. We are fortunate in that our children can participate in any amount of classes at the public school that we choose, although we may be required to pay tuition if the child doesn't attend enough classes to give the school state money for that child. If you're just sending your kids for sports, then you usually don't have to pay. However, much of the time although the child can play local games and participate in practices, should the team go to state competition, the STATE won't allow homeschooled children to play, which is really sad.

I would much rather live in a state without regulation at all. I'm interested in testing my children for my own records and my own peace of mind, but I do not think that it is the government's responsibility or right to require that information from me. I do have to admit that I get rather frustrated that there are a few families in my area that are "homeschooling" and their kids are way behind and I know those parents aren't doing much at all. They give those of us that put education foremost for our families a bad name. I do feel however, that kids fall through the cracks just as easily in public school and it really should be the right and responsibility of the parent to ensure their child has the best possible future.

Dutchbabiesx2
03-03-2011, 11:21 AM
In Co, you just send a letter with your intent (which for my district, as soon as I sent it in via e-mail, we were official), starting at 3rd grade equivalent, the kids need to be tested, but there is a fine print clause that many know about, you can get a certified teacher to interview your kids or review their work and get a certificate to mail in!

Pretty simple!

PaganHSMama
03-03-2011, 11:36 AM
I am in PA...Enough said!

farrarwilliams
03-03-2011, 05:57 PM
PA is a state that I would specifically not move to based solely on their homeschool laws. Not that I was dying to move to PA anyway or anything, just sayin...

Riceball_Mommy
03-03-2011, 07:41 PM
PA is a state that I would specifically not move to based solely on their homeschool laws. Not that I was dying to move to PA anyway or anything, just sayin...

Could I get a quick summary of their laws? I've never thought of moving to PA, so never looked into but you've got me curious.

Sam
03-03-2011, 08:25 PM
I'm in Ontario. Here, because I pulled DD out of school I sent a letter of intent to the school board. With DD2 I won't have to cause she's never been in the system. And that's it. No reports, reviews, tests, nothing. I have the option of taking DD to get the Gr. 3, 6 and 9 provincial tests, but I don't have to. So yeah, minimal laws and I love it!

farrarwilliams
03-03-2011, 09:29 PM
Could I get a quick summary of their laws? I've never thought of moving to PA, so never looked into but you've got me curious.

Someone else should probably answer because I don't really know what I'm talking about, but don't you have to get both standardized testing AND a portfolio review in PA. And I feel like I've only ever heard BAD things about the portfolio review. It's not like in MD where some people have bad experiences, but for the most part, it's just a very simple check that you're doing *something* - it's an every little box checked kind of thing. Ugh.

I also have a negative idea of NY and a couple of other states... I'm glad we live here where it's pretty minimal in practice.

InstinctiveMom
03-03-2011, 10:53 PM
As a Texan, we are among the least restrictive states. We are considered a "private school" and the state does not regulate private schools. We do not have to even inform anyone that we are homeschooling, so Texas is one of those states that has NO idea how many homeschoolers there are. They do not try to account for the kids that are not in public schools.
We do no standardized testing, have no requirements on attendance and report to no one.
On the flip side, we get no support from the state, we can access no services at the schools (with the exception of a FEW special education services), we cannot participate in extracurriculars at the schools (music, sports, etc.). We get no assistance in buying curriculum or anything else.
I am just happy as can be to have it stay the way it is.

Ditto for us!
~h

schwartzkari
03-03-2011, 10:56 PM
Ditto for us!
~h

Go Texas! :)

fbfamily111
03-04-2011, 09:55 AM
I also selected resent, my children, my choice. Here in NC the rules are very moderate compared to some other states I've lived in, but restrictive compared to Indiana where I'm from. I think I would even resent rules of a more lax nature, but I'm very much against a "nanny" state so everyone should take my "rants" with a grain of salt. My real issue is they put all these rules on you and what do I get? I still have to pay taxes to support the schools, but I can't use their books, supplies, sports? Doesn't sound right to me.....

StartingOver
03-04-2011, 10:14 AM
I have homeschooled in Texas, Alaska, and Montana. I really resented having to give notification to Montana. Government has no place in my school. They need to clean up their own dung piles first.

PaganHSMom, hubby would love to live in Pa close to his brother. But It.Will.Never.Happen as long as we have children to educate !

leav97
03-04-2011, 10:37 AM
Other:My state/country has somewhat restrictive laws but it doesn't bother me.

MN requires an annual letter of intent, annual testing (that only goes to you), and if you don't have a GED quarterly report cards. You are required to teach basic subjects and should be able to show that you actually taught if asked.

I can see why this would bother some people. There are efforts to make it easier. But, it doesn't really bother me.

leav97
03-04-2011, 10:41 AM
My real issue is they put all these rules on you and what do I get? I still have to pay taxes to support the schools, but I can't use their books, supplies, sports? Doesn't sound right to me.....

The courts in MN ruled that because you are a tax paying citizen your children have access to whatever portions of public school you choose. This is true for both private and home schooled students. So we can do sports, classes, special ed but, not books.

anywaybecause
03-04-2011, 02:17 PM
I agree w/ Addlepated -- MA has no laws on the books, only case law, & I consider that pretty minimal. I find it amusing that HSLDA labels us as a Highly Regulated state, b/c the reality is that pretty much all the burden is on the district to prove that we're doing worse than they could. <guffaw!> One thing to note is that, while there are several types of assessment listed (portfolio, standardized test, progress report . . . ) the district and the parents must agree upon one type. The case law uses the word "mutually" and since there's really no way for the district to force us to, say, go with a standardized test instead of a progress report, the type of assessment usually winds up being whatever the parents want. Most hsers that I know who *have* run into trouble with their district have found that, once they start quoting case law, the district backs down pretty quickly.

MarkInMD
03-04-2011, 02:56 PM
I had to choose other because Maryland's laws aren't super strict and so far I've had an easy time with the reviews (only had one review though). It drives me crazy that the law is a bit vague, so if you interpret it differently then the reviewer then you might get into trouble. I mean what shows regular thorough instruction to you may be lacking or too much someone else. So anyway so far I really don't hate it and I like the idea of the review, but I can't say I love the actual process.

That's about where I'm at, too. Our homeschool reviewers at the board of ed are retired teachers and really don't seem to care much what we're doing as long as some sort of instruction is going on and you can show them examples. Honestly they don't seem like they put too much effort into the review process.

Jeni
03-04-2011, 03:13 PM
(Thanks to dbmamaz for this one!)

I live in North Carolina, and I guess we are sort of a moderately regulated state where homeschooling is concerned. Some people say they find the laws here quite restrictive, but except for the requirement to do a yearly standardized test, I have never really felt that way. NC makes lots of "suggestions" about how to do things, but they certainly don't enforce many of them, so I feel fairly good about the laws here.

What about you? Are you a lover or a hater concerning the homeschooling laws in your state or country of residence?

Ditto. We are from NC as well and have not seen it as restrictive at all. I like the yearly testing, it helps keep dh and I on track. You only have to register once, which is nice. I do kind of think you should have to register each child. I think it's important to have an accurate count so people know how powerful homeschooling really is. I do like how uncomplicated NC homeschooling is. There are not 16 different types of homeschooling, no portfolios required, no teacher oversight, no degree requirements. It could be much worse.

onyxravnos
03-04-2011, 03:22 PM
Alaska as no laws regarding homeschooling. I love it! If you want to use one of the state run programs you have to abide by their rules of course but legally you don't have to report anything to anyone, ever.

Jeni
03-04-2011, 06:25 PM
The courts in MN ruled that because you are a tax paying citizen your children have access to whatever portions of public school you choose. This is true for both private and home schooled students. So we can do sports, classes, special ed but, not books.

This is true, or it was 12 years ago when we graduated. We are from MN and the high school dh and I went to offered all the extracurricular activities to homeschoolers. We had several people in marching band as well as in school classes like art and band/orchestra that they couldn't get at home.

rumbledolly
03-04-2011, 07:08 PM
Maine's rules are pretty easy to comply with though I do hear rumbling that our new governor (who needs a big huge mute button) may try to change regulations. Of course being new to this I might feel differently at portfolio or testing time! I don't mind them making sure we're making some sort of progress as long as the standards are as low as public schools standards for the state! That would make my DD a GENIUS!! ;);)

farrarwilliams
03-04-2011, 08:09 PM
One wonders if the "minimal" option is winning because people who live in states with less regulation are more likely to homeschool.

dbmamaz
03-04-2011, 10:06 PM
But it also sounds like a lot of people consider the requirements minimal even if they arent less stringent than average?

raegan
03-06-2011, 01:58 AM
I'm thinking people are saying "minimal" because they're not familiar with what else there is out there. In Missouri (where I live), homeschoolers do not have to register, but parents can be called upon to produce records showing x number of hours covering specific subjects (and/or portfolio), totaling y number of hours. Compulsory schooling age isn't until 7. It's generally not enforced except in cases of DFS investigations, divorce, or if somebody pisses off the wrong school board member, I guess. Many people I know do not even bother keeping official records, though. I don't know yet if I will (again, not until age 7 anyway!) but since I do tend to be an outspoken feather-ruffler, I probably should. :P

Some districts may allow hs'ers to participate in a very rudimentary way in some extracurriculars, but MSHAA (Missouri State High School Activities Association, which regulates all state-sanctioned competitions from sports to band to forensics) won't allow hs'er to participate at any competitive level. Which totally effing sucks and should be illegal as all hell. Taxpayers, living in a district, should have access to those extracurricular activities the district provides...and there could even be a stipulation that the child participates in the specific school where s/he would attend, but MSHAA insists there's a "school shopping" issue that would leave teams unfairly stacked. (wtf-ever.) Yes, I know my oldest isn't even 6yo, but hopefully by the time he's junior high age & wants to participate in sports (because he IS a jock), I can have helped to straighten some of that BS out legislatively. (rather than through the flaky idiots at MSHAA--my dad served on several committees. they are idiots.) Sorry for the rant; it's been something on my mind a LOT these past couple weeks. There are some homeschool teams in the area for various sports, but they're ALL Christian--REEEEEALLY Xtian--and this Atheist-and-Muslim household isn't going to voluntarily put our kids through that!

Heh, so you can probably figure out that I resent all regulations, huh? It pisses me off because kids are not property of the state (or anyone!), but are treated as such any time there is a law regulating their "proper" education (et al). Even standardized tests are ridiculous to me, even if they have no consequences.

I live on the border with Kansas, which truly does have minimal regulation: register your child and you're good. Which is one reason we would <gasp!> consider moving across the state line.

dbmamaz
03-06-2011, 10:48 AM
BTW, the main reason in VA for not allowing the kids in the competitive sports is the existing rule for the school students themselves - kids are not allowed to participate in competitive sports unless they have some minimum GPA - and there is no way to enforce that rule on the home schoolers. The two state home school groups have been trying to work with the legislature on it, but it is a hard problem.

jess
03-06-2011, 03:16 PM
I'm in Nevada. You file a Notice of Intent with the local school district when you start homeschooling or your child turns 7 if you homeschool from the start. This is supposed to include a course of study for one year - most people do a general overview of what subjects they plan to cover and what curriculum they're using. It's a formality - they can't stop you from homeschooling on the basis of this or if you don't stick to it.

That's it, unless you move, put your child back in public school and then pull them again, or legally change your child's name. Then you have to file it again. But if all the legal details stay the same, you're set until graduation. There are no testing, portfolio, or really any sort of progress requirements - you're simply absolving the state of their responsibility to teach your child.

You can file further paperwork and have your child do stuff (like band, or individual subjects) through the public school on a space-available basis.

TBH, I think I'd be happier with a little more accountability. But I'm also very happy to be able to work at a pace that works for us and not have to worry about saving all sorts of work for a portfolio or something.

Jess24
03-07-2011, 10:38 PM
We homeschool in Ohio and the laws here are more of an anoyance than restrictive so I chose other. I think Ohio has the appearance of being tough, but isn't really. We have to notify our local superintendant or his/her representative that we are planning to hs. We have to submit a "curriculum" or subjects of study "for information purposes only," agree that we have a high school diploma and agree to school for 900 hours. We also have to agree to covering the usual subjects along with Ohio history. I ususally cut and paste the grade level from worldbook.com. Then at the end of the year we have to do a portfolio assessment by a certified teacher or other person mutually agreed upon by the superintendent and the parent or we can test and submit the score. The portfolio review is usually the easiest being since the form states that the portfolio has been reviewed and the student is performing to the best of their abilities. It's a lot of busy work and I only seem to resent it when it comes time to fill out the forms. Other than that our schooling is pretty flexible. Although me and many of my other hs friends are a bit jealous of the more relaxed laws of our neighboring states.

When we lived in South Carolina, I felt those rules were fine, just that once a year annoyance. We had to join a hs group, usually for a minimal cost and they handled all the notifications and kept all the records and would help with transcripts if necessary. At the end of the year we had to fill out an afidavit stating that we schooled 180 days, but there was no interactions with the state at all. We also had to list our objectives for the year. More cut and paste.

ElizabethB
03-26-2011, 10:39 AM
I'm going to try this again. 2 previous posts lost to cyberspace (read: user error.) I live in TX and the non-secular community has lobbied for decades against regulation of homeschool. For that, I am thankful. When first considering homeschool, I researched and found the Texas Homeschool Coalition website that had a 30 second video from Gov Rick Perry supporting homeschool. I appreciated the support and ignored the cheesy smile, crazy twinkle in his eye, and, of course, the "God Bless You" at the end.
If I ever move to another state, I would have to consider their laws because it's pretty lax here.

dragonfly
04-21-2011, 10:03 PM
Actually, this is incorrect. Under current NH law, you must submit an intent to hs every year, AND submit some sort of evaluation EVERY year. It can be a standardized test (40th %ile is correct), portfolio review by certified teacher, or some other valid measurement tool mutually agreed upon by parent and superintendent/private school principal. So, unless the laws change (and given the activities of the legislature the past few years, it's a possibility), you must continue to submit evaluations and intent forms every year, as long as you homeschool.

FWIW, I find the regs here irritating and borderline onerous at times, mostly because I feel they are soooo unnecessary...but I tolerate them, because I don't want to give the "homeschool haters" another excuse to impose harsher rules.

:) Kara (hs-er in NH since 2001)


I'm new to hs'ing this year, but this is my understanding for NH: For the first 2 years of homeschooling in NH you must have your child's portfolio evaluated by a certified teacher OR have your child take a standardized test. The child must score at the 40th percentile for his/her grade level in order to show learning is taking place. After the second year, nothing is required. So, this sounds great to me. I must admit I am nervous about the upcoming testing even though the bar is set pretty low. I even rearranged ds's math schedule to switch from decimals to geometry when I found out that geometry was on the test. The curriculum he was using had him starting geometry towards the end of the year after the standardized test. I guess I worry just because we all want to continue hs'ing, so I'll jump through their hoops the first 2 years.

Symmetry
06-07-2011, 07:05 AM
I'm an American expat living in Hong Kong where homeschooling is illegal. We're about to move to Shanghai where homeschooling is also illegal. We're going to continue to homeschool regardless. I used to teach in the local schools and there is no way I'll put my daughter through that.

Eileen
06-07-2011, 01:29 PM
This is basically how it is handled in NJ except we are not considered private schools. We are allowed to homeschool under the same statute that allows private schools to run (something about equivalent education). No reporting, no notification, no testing but no using their resources either. I'm good with it.

Yes, I'm in NJ also and I was pleased to find that out when we started looking into it. And actually, if a school system has a deal with a local private school where they do share resources, they also have to let the HS people in on it. That doesn't apply in our district though.

Busygoddess
06-07-2011, 03:20 PM
In IL, we are considered private schools. That means we do not have to test, we do not have a minimum number of days or hours, we do not have to register, and we get to set our own graduation requirements & issue diplomas. If you pull a child out of public school to homeschool, you have to inform them that you are removing the child from the district. This is mainly so they don't waste time coming after you for truancy, if your child isn't supposed to be in their schools anymore. If you homeschool from the beginning, you don't have to inform anyone of anything. We have to teach the same subjects as the public schools, and instruction must be in English. Basically, you must provide an education that is comparable (or superior) to that which is offered by the public schools. Of course, all these freedoms mean that the burden of proof falls on us. If someone reports you & you are investigated, you have to prove that you are in compliance with the law.

mamakaty
07-11-2011, 11:15 PM
I'm going to try this again. 2 previous posts lost to cyberspace (read: user error.) I live in TX and the non-secular community has lobbied for decades against regulation of homeschool. For that, I am thankful. When first considering homeschool, I researched and found the Texas Homeschool Coalition website that had a 30 second video from Gov Rick Perry supporting homeschool. I appreciated the support and ignored the cheesy smile, crazy twinkle in his eye, and, of course, the "God Bless You" at the end.
If I ever move to another state, I would have to consider their laws because it's pretty lax here.

Ditto!!! :)