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Topsy
10-06-2010, 08:19 AM
One thing some people don't realize about secular homeschoolers is that they aren't ignorant about religion. Many of us grew up in various faiths, and were sometimes quite immersed in a particular religion for a while. Others may have not have had an upbringing in a specific denomination, but have spent a significant amount of time studying various religions and have a varied knowledge about both current religious trends and religious history. For this reason, a lot of secular homeschoolers find that they want to share this knowledge with their children and so religion can sometimes be a subject that secular homeschoolers pursue.

What is your feeling about this? Do you study religion formally or informally in your secular homeschool?

wild_destiny
10-06-2010, 08:27 AM
We have not really officially studied religion by itself, but my sons study various religions as they relate to the history they are studying. For instance, both my sons are really into all things Japanese, so this includes studying Japanese history, which brings about the studying of historical and present major Japanese religions. Even though I have my own (strong) views on certain religions (or perhaps, more accurately, the extremists in various religions, less than the religions, themselves), I would rather my children learn about the beliefs of others with as much of an open mind as possible, both the good and bad of each one. They can make up their own minds about what they believe and hopefully know ahead of time potential pitfalls in following a certain route.

jettyspagetti
10-06-2010, 09:17 AM
We're a mixed household. I'm the athiest who respects everyone's personal beliefs and my husband is Southern Baptist. Sure gets complicated sometimes. When I was growing my family was Catholic. I went to a Catholic church until I made my first communion and then had the option to go or not go. My mother at that point decided she wasn't a believer but encouraged me to go to church with as many friends as would invite me so that I could learn what different people believed. I've been to services for just about every kind of belief at this point and for a few years really tried to get into church with my hubby to support him.(I even taught sunday school to 3 year olds. One it got me out of regular church and two I figured if it was simple enough for toddlers maybe I'd figure out the attraction too.) It just wasn't for me. My children have been exposed to my husband's beliefs and mommy's beliefs and whenever it comes up in our studies I try to present a fair portrayal of whatever belief system is currently being discussed. Plus the neverending car discussions as we pass the bazillion churches in town. Meanwhile Hubby encourages my son to read the Bible and look for relevance in what it says- not in the bigotry some people find in it.

Busygoddess
10-06-2010, 09:53 AM
My husband is Christian & I'm an Eclectic Pagan. I was forced to go to a Baptist church until age nine. Then, my mom finally decided that she didn't want to force us to go to church, like her parents had forced her. So, I stopped attending church & started searching for what I believed; all I knew at that point was that it wasn't Christianity or Catholicism (most of our extended family is Catholic). I studying various different religions while trying to determine which would fit me. My kids have free choice when it comes to religion. I want them to make an informed decision about what religion, if any, they choose to follow. They're exposed to our beliefs, but not forced to follow either.
We study them in historical context when they pop up in our History studies. We also do a World Religions study where we study each religion on its own & more in-depth, but I don't really count it as part of school.

MamaB2C
10-06-2010, 10:00 AM
We have not formally started teaching it due to his age, but it has come up (with him suddenly saying grace) and we address it. So far we stick to it as a diversity issue "Grandma prays because of her beliefs, others pray differently, or don't pray at all". Actually, trying to explain the concept of deity, without believing it, has been difficult for us. DS doesn't understand exactly what it is Grandma prays to. We plan to introduce all religious beliefs.

We have been unable to posit Santa as a real being as well though, we talk about him with a giant wink and nudge, so it's clear it's a fun traditional game. I don't even think there is anything particularly wrong with it, but I couldn't bring myself to actively convince my child that there are actual magical beings watching him.

He is free to believe anything he wants, but we want it to come from his thoughtful study, not indoctrination.

allisonsracquet
10-06-2010, 10:22 AM
We are an agnostic family (I was raised extremely catholic and I am the only member of my family who has not baptized her children). We teach about all religions and try to point out the similarities between the religions as opposed to the differences (for example, "The Golden Rule" exists in all organized religions). We also use Time4Learning, and in the 6th grade social studies curriculum they teach about all of the major world religions in relation to history, and some of the major characters in the religions. So far we have only done Judaism, Hindu, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism but I am finding it is a nice unbiased introduction to world religions. It is very important to me to emphasize that religion often has a lot to do with where people are located geographically (and that religion is often humans way of trying to expain the unexplainable). I definitely feel like religion is relevent, but in our house we really try to make sure that all religions are given equal respect and emphasis.
I agree that many believe that agnostics know little about religion or teach little about religion which is false. There was an interesting article on Yahoo the other day worth checking out. It polled people on religion and found that Mormons, atheists, and agnostics knew the most about other religions. It also quizzed people and found that many did not know the basic facts and information about their own faiths.

JinxieFox
10-06-2010, 10:31 AM
I teach about the Pagan holidays as they come up 8 times a year, and my Pagan beliefs. My ex-husband teaches about the Christian holidays and beliefs. Our goal is to show our son that while these are our religions, neither one *has* to be his. We teach religion as it comes up, but will move into comparative religions later on as our son matures.

hockeymom
10-06-2010, 10:35 AM
Neither my husband nor myself are religious, and DS has made it clear that he equates modern religions with ancient mythologies. My husband did grow up going to church and going through the motions, but I'm not clear if his parents are actually religious and believe in what they listen to or if they just attend church out of habit and because it's "what people do". At any rate, it made no impression on my husband. I didn't go to church as a kid except on occasion, and that was to an ultra liberal hippie Methodist church that my parents attended for the social aspect. It was a very macrame-potlucks-group camping trips type of church but when they got a new pastor who actually talked about religion my parents immediately stopped going (as did most of the congregation). We never discussed religion growing up and it was just a non-issue, as it remains in my life today.

I'll gladly point DS in the right directions if he ever shows any interest in learning more about religion, but he is so scientific minded that I'm not sure it will come up much, at least not in a "what higher power do I believe in" sort of way. We do learn about mythologies as we study the ancient world and will discuss modern religions as they come up in our world studies, but I can't imagine spending lots of time on it other than in historical context unless he's interested.

The Santa issue is one I just can't come to terms with. It actually took a lot of work on our end to "convince" DS that Santa is real, and the only thing that convinced him came from a scientific source (or seemingly so--the very fun NORAD Christmas Eve Santa flight site). I'm wondering when we'll have to confess and I secretly hope to every year--I can't stand lying to him like this and going through these ridiculous hoops to make something out of nothing. To make matters worse for some reason we introduced "advent elves" who put a little something in his advent calender every.single.night of advent. He LOVES the advent elves and probably believes in them more than Santa but it causes me so much stress to come up with 24 little things for his calender. I hope the charade ends soon, but I'm stuck with it for now.

Sort of off topic but related: Did anyone watch Glee last night? While I commend them for bringing up religion AND atheism, I wonder why it is that non-believers are always portrayed as lacking something in their lives, or having come to their lack of faith in a god as a result of something horrible and scarring in their lives? Why can't we be portrayed as just simply, well, non-believers? Simple as that?

Shoe
10-06-2010, 10:53 AM
Yes I do. As I've mentioned on a few other threads, I'm giving my kids a comparative religion course this year, using a book called My Friends' Beliefs. Religion is an important part of a lot of people's lives throughout the world, and I think it's good to have some understanding of different religions.

dottieanna29
10-06-2010, 11:55 AM
We will be studying religions as they come up in our curriculum but expanding on what is there. We will be studying various religions when we do our Geography study (probably starting early next year) and we will expand on the various religions found in different times/areas as we are doing our History program (Mosaic using SOTW). We are doing a study of various Creation stories at the end of our Prehistory study before we start History. Obviously we are keeping it very simple for now since they are pretty young (they'll probably be 6 and 4 when we actually start doing this). I think I'm going to have the most problem with Christianity because at this point I have kind of an ick feeling about it (whereas I'm pretty neutral on all the others).

We have no problems or issues with Santa Claus. :-) My oldest obviously doesn't believe but the younger two do. We don't make a huge deal over it and since they get gifts from a bunch of Grandparents, I'm not sure they see it as a big deal. Other than watching the usual movies and saying "Santa is coming tonight" we don't go crazy. We also don't use him as a threat for good behaviour since I think that could cause some hurt feelings when they find out he's not real.

elkhollow
10-06-2010, 12:51 PM
We absolutely teach religion and are studying Islam right now, as it pertains to medieval history. Secular homeschooling to me doesn't mean not teaching religion, it means teaching without a religious perspective.

MamaB2C
10-06-2010, 03:30 PM
It actually took a lot of work on our end to "convince" DS that Santa is real

I foresaw that it would take some amount of work, and simply couldn't find a good enough reason to justify it to myself.

The one good thing about Glee last night, was that Kurt didn't "come around" at the end. I was really expecting him to have a conversion, because that's what Prime time TV usually does.

hockeymom
10-06-2010, 03:47 PM
I foresaw that it would take some amount of work, and simply couldn't find a good enough reason to justify it to myself.

The one good thing about Glee last night, was that Kurt didn't "come around" at the end. I was really expecting him to have a conversion, because that's what Prime time TV usually does.

1. I am envious that you went that route regarding Santa. I totally wish we'd done the same

2. TOTALLY! I expected him too and I'm sure the network is having to make all sorts of apologies today. I also loved a few of the things that Sue came up with. I'm shocked the show somehow got away with it.

Teri
10-06-2010, 03:56 PM
We are doing a Comparative Religion study as it pertains to our other courses. So far, we have, looked at Judaism and Christianity, but I plan on hitting a BUNCH more.

dottieanna29
10-06-2010, 03:59 PM
2. TOTALLY! I expected him too and I'm sure the network is having to make all sorts of apologies today. I also loved a few of the things that Sue came up with. I'm shocked the show somehow got away with it.

Isn't Glee on Fox Network? I remember when they first became one of the big Networks. They always loved having the shows that pushed the envelope too much for the other Networks to show them. I remember when the Simpsons first came on, everyone was shocked at how irreverent it was about everything - religion, politics, school, etc.

archibael
10-06-2010, 05:06 PM
The Santa issue is one I just can't come to terms with. It actually took a lot of work on our end to "convince" DS that Santa is real, and the only thing that convinced him came from a scientific source (or seemingly so--the very fun NORAD Christmas Eve Santa flight site). I'm wondering when we'll have to confess and I secretly hope to every year--I can't stand lying to him like this and going through these ridiculous hoops to make something out of nothing.


I struggled with this, too, as I didn't want my children to think I ever purposely lied to them, but ultimately I decided to go with it as a relatively harmless way to instill a healthy suspicion of authority figures-- including me.


Sort of off topic but related: Did anyone watch Glee last night? While I commend them for bringing up religion AND atheism, I wonder why it is that non-believers are always portrayed as lacking something in their lives, or having come to their lack of faith in a god as a result of something horrible and scarring in their lives? Why can't we be portrayed as just simply, well, non-believers? Simple as that?

Haven't watched Glee this week, but I, too, find that the nonbelieving viewpoint is seldom portrayed unapologetically.

Riceball_Mommy
10-06-2010, 05:34 PM
My daughter is only in Kindergarten so religion isn't a big topic. We will study all religions as the come up in relation, to what we are studying. I'm Eclectic Pagan though so I'm trying to teach my daughter a little bit about my faith, and my grandmother has explained some aspects of Christianity to her as it has come up in some questions. Since my husband is Agnostic, we celebrate all secular holidays (or secular versions) as well as Pagan holidays.

I would eventually love to do a world religions study like I did in high school, it would be fun to read all the different creation stories in a literature unit.

As for Santa, Santa is a big deal to my husband. He doesn't even want to know when our daughter stops believing. I always say though that Santa is physical embodiment of the spirit of the season, so he's real in that sense.

schwartzkari
10-06-2010, 10:37 PM
At the request of my daughter, we have taken on reading the Torah and doing worksheets on the Old Testament. My family is Jewish and we do follow our religion but I set out to make our curriculum secular. So for us, we are religious but we keep it out of our other homeschool subjects.

Aandwsmom
10-07-2010, 11:50 AM
We are totally secular! No religion taught.
My boys know what religion is, but I feel the overall choice is theirs when grow up.
I grew up the same way. I went to church with friends when I stayed over at their house, etc. but I feel that it is a personal choice for people.
Plus I do not agree with one religion telling me what to believe, that is my choice and if I want to believe bits and pieces from different religions, that is my choice.

farrarwilliams
10-07-2010, 02:16 PM
It always comes back to Santa, doesn't it? Lol. We have a formal anti-Santa curriculum. At age 1, we explained that there was no Santa.

Okay, more seriously... We do religion as it comes up, especially as it pertains to history. However, the kids also go to Sunday school at our UU church and I figure that takes care of some other chunk of it, though I am not always happy with the curriculum they use (not because of the content, just because I think it's poorly constructed and executed). At some point, we may do religion as a formal curriculum. As it is now, whenever we encounter religious ideas, the kids are always like, "Is that REAL? Is it TRUE?" To which I almost always reply, "Well, some people think it is. What do you think?"

Wilma
10-07-2010, 08:43 PM
I honestly don't know how to answer this.

We are practicing Lutherans. My 2 older girls voluntarily do Bible reading daily. We do not have a Bible class. We discuss and study all religions as they come up. We just studied Hinduism with a study of India. When we move into Japan and the Far East we will do Buddhism. I feel very strongly that my kids needs to know what is out there and at times really wrestle with their faith, comparing it with other beliefs. In fact, really wrestle with any belief that is important. I firmly believe no belief, be it religious, moral, whatever, is really yours until you have fleshed it out and had it tested in the real world.

But as for a formal religion class? No we don't have it.

mommykicksbutt
10-08-2010, 01:17 PM
I'm an atheist (recovering Roman Catholic), hubby is a very devout Roman Catholic (he convert from Byzantine Catholic) (yes, there have been lots of fireworks at our house over the years on the subject of our differing beliefs).

Sonny is being forced to go through confirmation classes at hubby's church by his dad. Sonny hates it. His churchy class is every Tuesday night (cancelling other activities) for 2 long hours of BS and boredom. On Wednesday morning before school, sonny tells me all the crap that was shoved down them by the "teacher." She doesn't let the kids question her. Dialogue is one way only. But I allow sonny to find and voice any/all holes in her statements, he's a very logical thinker. I also help him with his "homework."

He is only going through the motions of confirmation to keep his dad happy and off his back until he can be on his own. He saw what happened with his sister. Hubby insisted that she attend mass and youth group until she turned 18 (after high school graduation). She did but always with a fight. He then wanted to have the "Father-daughter-holy spirit" talk about her being responsible for her spiritual life now and she stopped him and gave him a piece of her mind on the subject... about how she has NEVER fallen for all the crap in any mythical religion invented by a bunch of ignorant illiterate nomadic desert dwelling goat herders that lived 2000 years ago and anybody who was gullible to believe such crap was delusional and a fool. It broke her dad's heart. Sonny doesn't want to do this to his dad.

Sonny has asked that after this year (confirmation classes go until May 2011), that we do a cultural study (he knows that religion is cultural- i.e. where you are born very likely determine what religious book you will be handed) to balance out all the heavy catholic Christianity he is being exposed to. He knows there are many varying believe systems out there and wants info on them all so he can be more informed. The Teaching Company has a set of DVD courses that include the 5 major religions current in the world as well as a Cultural course. We will do those.

Currently, you can not study history, art, or even world literature through the ages without religion's shadow being cast upon it. How can one study Charlemagne, the Spanish Inquisition, the 30 Year's War, Galileo, Dante, or the Crucible without discussing religion? Do we use a religious curriculum? Absolutely NOT. Do we address the effects of religion upon the subject currently at topic, yes, to whatever degree sonny wishes.

Sonny claims to be an ignostic agnostic: He doesn't know whether or not if a god exists, and he doesn't care either way, he just isn't letting his dad know this yet.

Fiddler
10-08-2010, 09:38 PM
Random thoughts pertaining to what I just read above--

I teach about the various religions when they come up in curriculum (SOTW is one where it does, and often) or conversation, but don't have a set comparative religion course that I teach separately but might later if Jazz continues to homeschool through high school.

DH and I are agnostic. He comes from a lapsed Catholic family and never attended church, and I come from a fundamentalist Christian family (whose still-practicing members are currently Pentecostal, GC Mennonite, and Presbyterian). While I try to talk with respect about my family's religion to my kids, I do make the point that they believe that their faith is the only one, and that anyone who doesn't believe it is going to hell. I think they're also getting the gist about all the trouble these "my way or the highway" religions cause from our study of history--the injustice of enslaving or killing and therefore not valuing people equally because they don't believe the "right" religion is something that has led to many an outraged look on my kids' faces, and we generally follow up with invigorating discussions.

RE: Glee!!! I was so afraid Kurt was going to "come around" in the end, but he didn't. Soooooooo happy about that!

archibael
10-09-2010, 12:15 AM
Glee was indeed good, but an atheist friend of mine and I were having a back and forth over her being offended by the fact that whenever atheism is portrayed in the media it's as a result of some emotional trauma rather than as a viewpoint obtained through rational thought and introspection. I let her know that screenwriters have a limited crayon box, and emotion happens to be the major color in it; not only that, but while rational thought and introspection are to be admired, they are seldom fascinating to watch on television.

Wilma
10-09-2010, 05:54 PM
I'm an atheist (recovering Roman Catholic), hubby is a very devout Roman Catholic (he convert from Byzantine Catholic) (yes, there have been lots of fireworks at our house over the years on the subject of our differing beliefs).


I'll be honest, this completely fascinates me. I really love being around interesting people with ideas we can discuss and bat around, but I just don't know if I could be married to someone who did not share my religious or political beliefs on at least a core level. I have often wondered how James Carville and Mary Matalin have stayed married as long as they have. They have their differences and his accent!

Anyway, kudos to you guys.

I like snickerdoodles. If I come visit can I have some?

mommykicksbutt
10-10-2010, 04:11 AM
I'll be honest, this completely fascinates me. I really love being around interesting people with ideas we can discuss and bat around, but I just don't know if I could be married to someone who did not share my religious or political beliefs on at least a core level. I have often wondered how James Carville and Mary Matalin have stayed married as long as they have. They have their differences and his accent!

Anyway, kudos to you guys.

I like snickerdoodles. If I come visit can I have some?

"Snickerdoodles"?! You bet, not only the state cookie of Kansas but also my fav. You're invited over anytime Wilma, I'm the neighborhood's friendly atheist and I believe everyone is entitled to hold whatever believe that they think is right.

I haven't always been an atheist, only for about the last 12 years or so. When hubby and I married we were both politically moderate and mass attending middle of the road catholics. But over the years both of our political and religious views changed. I lean more to the left, he to the right. I let him rant on about some topics keeping my opinion to myself because it will only incite an argument with him (he is always the one who losses his cool). He knows I have my opinions that are different from his and he knows that if I voice them that he will get mad so he doesn't ask me what I think on touchy subjects anymore (the marriage counselor told us never to discuss such things anymore, I refuse to engage hubby in religion no matter how much he tries to entice me.) What we do have in common is our morals and ethics (even though we attribute them differently). The bottom line is we share the same knowledge of right and wrong on the things that affect our family and us. We love and respect each other to not let our political and religious differences matter that much in our relationship. No matter how delusional he may be ;) he's a keeper.

SailingBull
10-13-2010, 12:57 PM
I definitely plan on teaching about different religions to my children when it comes up in context of other studies: i.e. history, social studies, geography, philosophy... Right now we're in the pre-preschool phase so I've got time.

As far as teaching the dogma of any particular religion, I will probably limit my teaching of that in context with what / why people believe and how it has / will affect the actions of people.

Personally, I think every religion from Christianity to Athiesm is a plague. The notion that we can answer questions we have no knowledge base for is rediculous. While there may be redeeming lessons from a particular religion, most organized faiths have historically been used to shed personal responsibility while stripping the individual of personal rights and freedoms of it's congregation.
Religion does not teach moral value, the best it can accomplish is to coexist and not intrude on such values.

Fairielover
10-13-2010, 07:04 PM
We do not teach religion per se. But we do talk about it if it comes up. With all the family gatherings at holidays and such, it does come up. We are pagan and do talk about the Sabbats as they come up. He is a member of Spiral Scouts so religion is discussed there a bit. But most of the kids are little littles so we try to keep things lite and general. But he does ask questions, especially about the winter holidays. Santa brings gifts to Grandpa's house. Hannukah Harry brings gifts to his aunt, uncle, and cousins house, and Father Winter brings gifts to our house. However, Father Winter is not all crazy expensive like Santa. He only brings a stocking with some candy and a couple of small toys in it. We talk about the return of the light at Yule and how the days start getting longer on Yule. We also discussed that his cousins also celebrate using light with the Menorah. Grandpa believes the the Son of God was born on Christmas. We compare that to the light or the sun returning. It works for our son. As he asks questions, we will answer them as honestly as we can.

lynn0468
10-13-2010, 08:14 PM
I think religion and school should be seperate.

sis92y
10-14-2010, 06:40 AM
Hubs is non-practicing Roman Catholic and I'm a non-practicing Pagan. For us the only reason to insert religion into our daily home studies is when it applies directly to a historical event. As our girls age hubs and I have agreed to educate them on the many different faiths so they are better equipped to make the choice which fits them best, if they chose at all. And we both agree it is more important to have faith than to have religion.

mommykicksbutt
10-14-2010, 07:13 AM
... I think every religion from Christianity to Athiesm is a plague...

Atheism is NOT A RELIGION!!!!!!, it is the default position, a LACK of a belief (such as in the supernatural), it is the negative position as to those who hold a position of a belief (the affirmative position). It is not an organised belief system, it has no dogma, no organization, no tenants, no nothing. The "A" in atheist/atheism means no, not, lacking, opposed, to whatever word it is attached to, in this case "theism" which is a belief in something, in this case something supernatural or deities, aka a god. Therefore, atheism is a lack of a belief in a god. It is not a religion in any shape form or mean, it is the total lack of one and hence does not fit into your "plague" but rather, is the cure for the plague.

hockeymom
10-14-2010, 11:23 AM
Perfectly said, MKB.

archibael
10-14-2010, 11:35 AM
Atheism is NOT A RELIGION!!!!!!, it is the default position, a LACK of a belief (such as in the supernatural), it is the negative position as to those who hold a position of a belief (the affirmative position). It is not an organised belief system, it has no dogma, no organization, no tenants, no nothing. The "A" in atheist/atheism means no, not, lacking, opposed, to whatever word it is attached to, in this case "theism" which is a belief in something, in this case something supernatural or deities, aka a god. Therefore, atheism is a lack of a belief in a god. It is not a religion in any shape form or mean, it is the total lack of one and hence does not fit into your "plague" but rather, is the cure for the plague.

Hey, speak for yourself! I just got back from Atheist Temple, where we genuflected before Lord Darwin and prayed to the twin gods Dollar and Science.

49cats
11-22-2010, 06:17 PM
We don't have a formal program for teaching religion, and we don't bring it up merely as it relates to history. In fact, we talk about it quite a bit. Our family has recently joined a local freethinking group and we're in the process of integrating children into the meetings--not to indoctrinate, but rather hopefully teaching them critical thinking, logic, and science. Many of the members come from very religious backgrounds and my kids get a lot of exposure to these backgrounds and what processes these members went through to arrive at their present place. Our main goal is to instill in them the habit of always questioning to find out more.

We also discuss religions (from the "big three" to Buddhism to Hinduism to the varied religions of different indigenous tribes) quite often, just as "dinner conversation". We've talked about the notion that so many of the religions fuel conflict because they require a person to reject all others in order to accept theirs. We also get into conversations about how historical figures have used the fear factor in religion to assert their control over others. For example, we're reading Crispin: the Cross of Lead, (and sequels) right now to give us a window into Medeival commoners' lives, and have discussed how the "divine right of kings" kept the peasants fearful of the ruling class...from the lords up to the kings and church figures.

Stephany
11-22-2010, 08:25 PM
I don't see how you can avoid teaching at least a fundamental knowledge of the different religions in a comprehensive history program. Like it or not, various religious beliefs have shaped the whole of our civilization. While I avoid SOTW and others like it that teach religious parable as fact, I discuss the various belief systems and how they shaped history almost daily.

Stella M
11-22-2010, 08:27 PM
I think maybe once we did a unit on Buddhism, but in the main, we don't study religion. We do discuss it as it arises in daily life - friends, news etc. I think my eldest daughter may be interested in doing a comparative religion course when she is a little older but if she doesn't, that's ok.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
11-22-2010, 09:10 PM
I do plan to teach comparative religion to my kids at some point, probably when we discuss the history of the region where each religion originated. Does that make sense? My husband attends a Congregational UCC church, whose liberal and inclusive values are not objectionable to me (atheist). The kids are already learning about Christianity there and their dad has talked about Judaism as well. I've made it clear to him that he needs to tell the kids that the Bible isn't meant to be read as literal truth. I've already had to sort my six-year-old out about the creation story.

I know I can safely confess this here: the smartass in me is tempted to sneak the Flying Spaghetti Monster into the pantheon of world religions. :)

Hampchick
11-23-2010, 03:41 PM
We will teach religion as it comes up and as questions are asked. We may or may not teach comparative religion--it will be a while before the boys are ready for that so we'll see. But, it needs to be taught at least as it pertains to history and culture. I don't think you can understand other cultures without looking at their mythology/religion/superstitions.