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Teri
09-11-2010, 01:33 PM
Are you committed to homeschooling through high school?
Or is this a temporary solution that you don't consider long term?



For us, I would love to homeschool through high school.
The only consideration for us will be finances. Right now, we are really struggling with multiple salary cuts and benefit cuts. After a year at a reduced salary we have finally come to the end of our rope and I am having to really watch everything we spend money on.
The thought of sending them to school really scares me though. I have a very quirky 5th grader who is ADD (inattentive type). Our family is full of his type though and he fits in just fine around here. LOL I have a 3rd grader who is Dyslexic and requires some special handling even though she now reads at a 5th grade level. And I have a 2nd grader that is doing a 6th grade curriculum for everything but math. In math, she is doing a 4th grade curriculum. Her reading level is much higher than that. I really worry about what would happen to all of them in school.
So, we are limping along financially hoping that our situation improves soon.

How about you?

LJean
09-11-2010, 01:51 PM
For now, we are taking it year by year. I want to homeschool through middle school, but can't say if my daughter will decide she wants to go to public school for high school. If she wants to continue all the way through, I am all for it. :)

Riceball_Mommy
09-11-2010, 01:55 PM
Right now I'd love to homeschool through high school, but of course my daughter is only 5. I know that things change easily and quickly so right now we are just taking it year by year, but we are taking the adage of "If it's not broke don't fix it" and so far homeschooling is working.

Busygoddess
09-11-2010, 02:06 PM
We're definitely homeschooling through high school. If finances become a problem, we'll figure it out. There is no way the kids will go to public school, though. I really don't have a choice. Both are doing work so far ahead that public school just isn't an option. Dea started high school level classes last year in some subjects & most of her classes this year are high school. In our state, we're considered a private school, so we don't have to follow ps scope & sequence, use charter or umbrella schools, etc. However, our local district won't accept high school credits from homeschoolers unless you use a state accredited program, which we don't. So, if she were to go to public school, she'd have to redo all the high school classes she completed before that. That would be such a waste of time & she'd be bored to tears, even in the Gifted Program. Jay isn't doing high school classes yet (seeing as he's only in 1st), but public school wouldn't be an option for him either, even though the district isn't as strict with previous homeschoolers in elementary or jr high. He's also really far ahead and would be bored out of his mind in public school. Plus, we're not following the typical scope & sequence for him either.
So, no matter what, public school will not be an option for us. Besides, we really enjoy homeschooling & the kids don't want to go to public school.

Teri
09-11-2010, 02:20 PM
We are in Texas, so we are also considered a private school. Caroline will be working at a high school level before I know it. :p
I feel like it is not an option either. I can't imagine any of them in public school (even though my oldest was fine in ps :p).

Mommytutu
09-11-2010, 02:40 PM
We plan to homeschool through high school, but nothing is set in stone. Public school is not an option but I might consider a private school if one of my girls desperately want to attend a traditional school.

InstinctiveMom
09-11-2010, 03:01 PM
We have no plans to return to institutionalized schooling... however if circumstances dictate, then we might consider it. The local ISD would be out unless things were dire.
~h

hockeymom
09-11-2010, 03:12 PM
DH agreed we could homeschool until we move to a better district, but now I think he's coming around to making it permanent. DS is so far ahead it would be useless to put him back into ps, just as the year and a half he spent there were useless. So I think and very much hope we're in it for the long haul.

belacqua
09-11-2010, 03:55 PM
We always planned to carry on through high school, and it looks like we're staying the course. The kid started Grade 9 a few weeks ago.

I suppose if he'd really wanted to go to school I'd have considered it, all the while lobbying strenuously for homeschooling, but he has no interest. When some marketing materials from a fancy prep school came in the mail, the kid tossed it in the recycling bin without even opening it (just as well, as I fished it out and saw the tuition...yikes!).

inmom
09-11-2010, 04:04 PM
We've taken each year one at a time, but we plan to homeschool through high school. Regarding finances, you'd be surprised how little you can live on and school on if you have to. Dh was jobless for several months last year, and you manage....

fbfamily111
09-11-2010, 04:57 PM
I'm hoping to homeschool through high school. In fact I want (fingers crossed) the kids to do duel enrollment when they're Jr/Sr's. If we decided to send them back to a traditional school I would a Christian/Catholic school over most PS (and we're Agnostic)!
I understand the financial constraints, DH was laid off for almost a year, so we had to get creative too.

dottieanna29
09-11-2010, 06:44 PM
We are planning to homeschool at least until high school. Our highschool is one of the top 10 in our state and has many people go there after doing private school or homeschool until 9th grade. My oldest currently attends there and they pretty much live up to the hype - I'd have no problem with my younger guys going there. We're homeschooling because we feel it's best for my son's learning style and better for us to deal with his little quirks than the public schools. If they want to attend public high school (strong involvement in sports with possibilities of scholorships or just want to) we'll probably let them. If they don't - we'll continue at home.

farrarwilliams
09-11-2010, 07:09 PM
Never say never, but we intend to go all the way through. I would not, under any circumstances, consider public school anywhere until possibly high school and even then I would be very hesitant... so with finances, unless millions of dollars plop in our laps I can't imagine the kids going to school.

But I totally respect short term homeschoolers too. I think it's a good short term option as well. Just my own personal deal that I can't look at public schools after having taught in them.

JinxieFox
09-11-2010, 10:08 PM
Best-case scenario, in my mind, we are. The idea is to homeschool my son until he is 16, at which point he is old enough to start accumulating college credits. At the same time, I do take it year by year and talk to my son about it. I ask him if he wants to continue to homeschool each new year, and realize that sometimes preferences or circumstnaces may change. So I am hoping and planning to homeschool through highschool, but understand that things might change.

StartingOver
09-11-2010, 10:22 PM
We are in it for the long haul. Here in Texas I require mine to graduate at 17. So if they decide to do the senior thing they can. One of my older children did. Of course he got no credit for it, as our district won't accept unaccredited courses. So it is either enter in 9th or go for social reason.

Something seriously drastic would have to happen for me to put them in before then. I have homeschooled while single, working full time. What ever it take. I believe homeschooling is best for my children. If my husband was to pass tomorrow, and I with him. There is enough life insurance for my daughter to homeschool and take care of my little ones and her family for many years. She knows how I feel, and would continue to homeschool them.

It is just that important to me.

Searcher_2010
09-11-2010, 11:03 PM
Ditto. I just read a J.T. Gatto book and my feeling is that I will never (the Universe willing) send my son to a institution again. That said, right now we are very lucky since I work at home (single-mom) and we are able to mix the homeschooling + the work - so that is the plan for now - hopefully the good luck will carry us through another 9 years!

Teri
09-11-2010, 11:25 PM
Oh yeah, I hope I didn't come off wishy washy. I meant barring any further major financial issues that would force me to find work (so far we have taken a 40% cut and the wiping out of all benefits), I plan on doing it for the long haul. I just meant that finances are the one thing that could throw a monkey wrench in it for me.

Melissa541
09-12-2010, 12:19 AM
so far we have taken a 40% cut and the wiping out of all benefits
Wow! We wouldn't be able to survive if that happened to us; we'd be knockin' on my momma's door looking for food & lodging. I hope it gets better for you soon.

I say we take it year by year, but I do hope to be able to HS all three girls through high school. This homeschooling thing has become a lifestyle for us. I can't see going back to a public school's schedule & demands.

Shoe
09-12-2010, 01:02 AM
I would like to homeschool through high school and so far am planning that with my son. My daughter (in her first year of homeschooling now) has said that she wants to go back to public school next year. I'm hoping she will really enjoy homeschooling and change her mind before the end of the year.

dbmamaz
09-12-2010, 01:45 AM
My older one is starting 9th grade here next week, and VA is a credit system, and he had an awful experience, so i cant imagine him going back to school. I am also not so sure he'll be ready for community college before 18. I mean, academically they have remedial classes he could probably do now, but emotionally is the real challenge.

my younger one is only entering 2nd grade. I really do hope he can go to public high school. If he finds his mojo, perhaps he could get in to the math and science specailty center . . . for now, all he cares about is legos and video games. But he's got some time to get his act together. My daughter applied but was rejected - its really competitive. But i think he's got the ability, its just the motivation which will make or break it.

SunshineKris
09-12-2010, 03:14 AM
At this point we anticipate the kids going to public high school. We are fortunate enough to be able to afford living in the area we want, and that should continue. For us, it's a matter of what school outside the home can offer at that level that we can't. These activities (both sports and other extracurriculars) can lead to further personal growth and possibly college money. Now, there's nothing that says we can't change our minds on this, and it will of course depend on many factors, including my kids' desires. Currently the kids are at their grade levels for most things (a bit ahead in both reading and math but not so far ahead that they'd be repeating material for years). I figure the kids are so young now (10, 8 and 4) that anything could happen.

Kylie
09-12-2010, 03:56 AM
The plan is to keep on going at home until......until either the kiddos decide that they want to go to school or until mum decides that the kiddos need to go to school hehehe (that is somewhat tongue in cheek). I will be honest and say there are days when I sit and think about the years ahead (my youngest is 2) and wonder if I have it in me. But generally those moments pass pretty quickly.

Like Wendy I always talk to my kids about school/homeschool and if they are happy. So far neither of them are ever, ever, ever going to school ROFL!!!!

Ed Ditto
09-12-2010, 09:16 AM
This is working today so we're doing it today. Beyond that we haven't thought much. While it's what our daughter needs, it's what we'll give her.

aggie
09-12-2010, 12:22 PM
We are in it for the long haul. My kids have always seen the grass as being greener on the other side. After letting them bounce back and forth from school to home, I decided we are home until things change to make public school a better choice. It is hard for a child that has always been home to suddenly be thrown to the lions in High school. I do like what someone said about finishing up around 17 and letting them go for Senior year purely as a social experience. I have a friend whose son, 16, is currently carrying out his own personal "social experiment" as he has finished high school. This peaked my kids interest but not sure how the local school district would respond.

Firefly_Mom
09-12-2010, 02:46 PM
We started homeschooling when our son was in 1st grade, with the intention of putting him back in ps in 3rd or 4th grade. Flash forward 9 years and he's still at home! We asked him if he wanted to go to a "real" high school this year, and his response to us was "Hell, no!" LOL

As for tight finances, we're right there with ya. If I have to go back to work, I'll choose a part-time job that allows me to work evening and weekends (which is what a lot of places are desperate for, as everyone else wants to work during the day while their kids are in school).

Sarbare0704
09-12-2010, 07:42 PM
Since we are super new at this still I guess we cannot be sure, but I would love for this to be a long haul kind of commitment! I feel like since she is starting a year early if she stay at this pace and I do end up having to put her into public school things will be so boring for her! and possible worse then just starting from the beginning!

amphibology29
09-12-2010, 11:43 PM
We're definitely homeschooling through middle school, and then we'll see. I'd like to homeschool all the way through, but if one or more of the kids really wants to try public school in high school, I'll consider it. It'll depend on where we are, what the school is like, and a whole host of factors. Honestly, I don't see Nikko wanting to do public school (and he's the only one old enough yet for me to have a gauge on.)

mommykicksbutt
09-13-2010, 07:52 AM
Homeschooling started as a temporary solution until we could find a school appropriate for sonny's intellectual (IQ over 150) abilities. We pulled him out of private school half way through 3rd grade. Finding such a place/program was impossible until 6th grade. The ps had a "seminar" program. Where 1% of the student population are GATE (gifted and talented education) 1% of the GATE kids are Seminar, this was my son (top 1000th percentile). 6th grade (middle school) was a disaster. Brand new school looked like a prison with few windows and barbed wire fences. Teachers were not qualified GATE or Seminar instructors. Bullying was rampant against the Seminar kids especially. The staff was impotent to do anything to curb the harassments. My son started the 6th grade with a thirst for learning (after 2 1/2 years of homeschooling) and high hopes just to have it sucked out of him by the public education system in a matter of a few months. By the school's end he hated school, refused to open any kind of book for any reason, and shut down to learning, his grades went in to the toilet. Over the summer after 6th grade we moved from California to Spain. We investigated the DODSS (Departement of Defense School System) before the move. His Mensa youth director (a qualified GATE Seminar teacher) helped us and we determined that DODSS was not the place for him so back to homeschooling. The change of environment, a new culture with lots of hands on exploring of something he loves (castles and knight lore) really helped (we planned history for the middle ages that year). It took all year to deprogram him from the awful public school educational beating he took.

He does not want to go back to public school, ever. He studies more efficiently and effectively from home than in the warehouse system. He has input in what and/or how he studies. He has more options and choices. We are in it for the long haul. He started 9th grade this year, we skipped 8th, he is soooo ready for high school. I will no longer subject my son to the warehouse learning environment of the public school system. We are homeschooling through high school for sure!

dandjsmama
09-15-2010, 01:13 AM
We're homeschooling until I'm an old lady. I just finished up with my 17 year old. My 10 yr old is homeschooling at about 5th grade, and my 6 yo old just started 1st grade level. I can't say I'm necessarily looking forward to doing it all over again for the 3rd time around, I'm running out of energy!, but I know from experience it will be new and different since each child brings their own energy and life to the process, so hopefully I'll have the stamina to keep up for 11 more years!

Wendy

MamaB2C
09-15-2010, 01:27 AM
We already do "school" around our work schedules-early mornings, evenings, and weekends- and take advantage of happily willing family and friends as caretakers for part of every weekday.

I work from home, and hope that continues (it should, but I never say never or always), but right now, DS is not independent enough for me to do both at the same. I don't expect that to always be the case.

I would love for his first step in an institution to be college, but I've no idea how he'll feel about things when he's older, so we'll see.

Baberry
09-15-2010, 01:44 PM
I'm going to homeschool until my kids say otherwise.

Theresa Holland Ryder
09-15-2010, 01:57 PM
This is year 10/11 for us, so I think we're in it for the long haul. I always said that if my kids really wanted to go to public school, they could. Up until my son was ready for high school, they weren't even tempted. My son's friends at work told him that he would miss "the best part of his life!" if he didn't go to public high school. The guidance counselor at our local high school (inadvertently) talked him out of it. :)

Somewhere there was a discussion about kids eventually being embarrassed by being at home with mom all day (I think from an NYTonline article on homeschooling). I asked my kids about this and not only are they not embarrassed, they've always felt like the coolest of their friends because they're homeschooled. And I can't even keep track of how many of their friends have begged me to homeschool them too. They usually recant after they spend a day with us, as homeschooling is not the easy school vacation that they imagine it is.

We wanted to be open to our kids having a choice, even though it would make me worry and gnash my teeth if they went to public school. One of the things about that choice though is that it affects our entire family life, and so it's not one that either of the kids can make lightly. A lot of the commenters on that NYT article, even homeschoolers, went on about how selfish the mom was for wanting to homeschool so that she had more time with her kid. I find this attitude that she's selfish really bewildering. One of the many reasons we homeschool is because it makes us a strong family. We get to be there for our kids and do things together that we would have never been able to do, had we not been homeschoolers. Is it so bad that I've learned things and grown as a person and enjoyed my kids' company? I'm certainly not keeping them home only for my behalf; I have a stalled career and stuff I'd like to get around to some day. But for us, it's not just about the kid. It's about what we want to be as a family, the values we want to impart, and the life we want to live together.

hockeymom
09-15-2010, 02:55 PM
I absolutely agree, Theresa. My hairdresser this morning was astounded that we homeschool--she was one of those who said "well I just can't wait for the kids to go back to school!", and although she was polite she clearly didn't understand that we--gasp!--have so much fun together! Keeping a strong family unit is paramount for us. Sometimes I just can't help but wonder why some people choose to have kids if they don't like them or if they treat them like "other" rather than an equal member of the family.

brandytab
09-15-2010, 10:16 PM
I like this place. :)

I couldn't say it better, how we feel about family here also. We enjoy our time together. Not because we just happen to have great luck, but because that's what we work toward - as parents. It's the type of family that we desire (frankly, I can't figure out why one wouldn't?) and we're both committed to that. Half of our reasons regarding moving to HSing is because it gives us more time to be a family and enjoy each other's company relaxed and not loaded up with deadlines. Life is too short - if i'm burdened with deadlines, at least let it be my own dang fault! LOL

I think you are right, hockeymom, I think the children become an "other". Sadly, I think folks like us are the minority.

Wilma
09-16-2010, 12:50 AM
Yes. we are in it for the long haul.

InstinctiveMom
09-16-2010, 02:24 AM
We wanted to be open to our kids having a choice, even though it would make me worry and gnash my teeth if they went to public school. One of the things about that choice though is that it affects our entire family life, and so it's not one that either of the kids can make lightly. A lot of the commenters on that NYT article, even homeschoolers, went on about how selfish the mom was for wanting to homeschool so that she had more time with her kid. I find this attitude that she's selfish really bewildering. One of the many reasons we homeschool is because it makes us a strong family. We get to be there for our kids and do things together that we would have never been able to do, had we not been homeschoolers. Is it so bad that I've learned things and grown as a person and enjoyed my kids' company? I'm certainly not keeping them home only for my behalf; I have a stalled career and stuff I'd like to get around to some day. But for us, it's not just about the kid. It's about what we want to be as a family, the values we want to impart, and the life we want to live together.




I absolutely agree, Theresa. <snip> Keeping a strong family unit is paramount for us. Sometimes I just can't help but wonder why some people choose to have kids if they don't like them or if they treat them like "other" rather than an equal member of the family.

Ditto all that for me. Looking back I see how much 'detachment' is necessary when you send your kids to school-school every day. I'm glad that we're not dealing with that anymore. We've always maintained that our children (all children) are complete and productive members of the family unit and should be treated as such. It's sad to me, the mind-set that when the children are at home, they're 'underfoot' or 'in the way' and that is only resolved by sending them off all day long.
~h

Shewolf
09-16-2010, 09:53 AM
I have no idea, as it depends on where we're going to live for then next twelve years, and for me, those two life decisions are connected. I'm taking everything six months at the time! :)

LagniappeAcademy
09-16-2010, 11:48 AM
We take it year by year (sometimes day by day) and child by child. I had no idea how long this would last when when we started this summer, but with each passing day I want to be in it for the long haul. That said, I don't know what life will bring or how the kids will feel about homeschooling years from now. My oldest had a say in it when we brought her home, and they'll both certainly have a say in it if either decides they want to go back at some point. Of course, mama has veto power, but I definitely take their opinions into consideration.

camaro
09-16-2010, 11:56 AM
We're in it for the long haul. In fact I think I look forward to the more advanced learning/teaching in the higher grades as I'm a fan of science and history. I think it would be more fun to dig deeper into these subjects with my boys as they advance through school. Besides that, there's no guarantee we'll even have a public school around by the time the boys are high school age. My wife drove a school bus for a few years. Those rural roads can be nasty. I'd rather have my boys safe at home than travelling to an even farther school in the kind of winter weather we see around here.

Jennifer Gray
09-16-2010, 04:50 PM
We are planning on homeschooling just for this year, due to living in a ghetto with horrid schools. My husband has taken a new job in a new district that so far we are in love with and plan to move after the new baby is born. This year will give us a year to observe how the new district works and just how the schools function...they have high test scores but that's not what we are looking for at this point in the game. I want a safe school that offers sports and the arts...so far this district offers both!

Pefa
09-21-2010, 09:15 PM
I assume we'll be hs'ing for awhile yet but it depends on whether I can meet my kids' educational & developmental needs.

My oldest boy hs'd until HS when he needed the socialization more than the education. We looked around, he found a good public high school (we're in a district that tuitions) did great got into the university he wanted and is doing great there.

melgriffin03
09-22-2010, 04:21 PM
I don't know how long we'll homeschool. I plan to do it as long as Ethan, and in a couple of years Emerson, want to.

kgm3
09-22-2010, 04:31 PM
For us, I would love to homeschool through high school.
The only consideration for us will be finances. Right now, we are really struggling with multiple salary cuts and benefit cuts. After a year at a reduced salary we have finally come to the end of our rope and I am having to really watch everything we spend money on.
The thought of sending them to school really scares me though. I have a very quirky 5th grader who is ADD (inattentive type). Our family is full of his type though and he fits in just fine around here. LOL I have a 3rd grader who is Dyslexic and requires some special handling even though she now reads at a 5th grade level. And I have a 2nd grader that is doing a 6th grade curriculum for everything but math. In math, she is doing a 4th grade curriculum. Her reading level is much higher than that. I really worry about what would happen to all of them in school.
So, we are limping along financially hoping that our situation improves soon.


since i am doing my best to use free curriculum stuff i have found that it's sooooo much cheaper to homeschool. robby was coming home almost every week w/something that required him to bring $ to school, fundraisers and charities and book fairs and all kinds of other stuff! the awful thing was that they somehow made him feel like crap if he couldn't bring the cash (and usually we didn't have any to give him)! it was just horrible!

elkhollow
09-25-2010, 04:11 PM
I am prepared to hs long term, all the way through high school, but my dh and I agreed that hs'ing my not be the best answer for both of our children for the duration. I think my dd, with her ASD, will be best served learning at home through high school, not just academically but socially. She is a beautiful, joyful, unique, intense, intelligent girl but others, particularly children, don't always appreciate someone who is different, and she is. I am more comfortable, at least for now, making sure she is socially active in things like Girl Scouts where I can monitor the situation. My ds is another story and I just don't know yet. We will do whatever will serve his needs best, I just don't know what that is yet. For him we will almost certainly hs through elementary. Then we'll assess.

It also depends on where we are living at the time (we're military so who knows where we'll be in five years), what the schools are like there, and what resources are available. I don't think all public schools are bad, just as not all private schools are good and not all homeschoolers do better for their kids than the local ps can. I want to have an open mind.

elkhollow
09-25-2010, 04:21 PM
There are lots of great public school teachers. It's just that there are lots of really, really pathetic ones, and you have no idea what you're going to get.

This is off the subject, but this reminds me of some of the "teachers" at the high school where I used to teach. The history wing was called "Coach's Hall" because so many of the social studies teachers were coaches. The man who taught a few doors down from me used to let his students watch Jerry Springer every day. Another gave them worksheets and read the sports page all day. Some of us worked really hard for these kids but as a parent you had very little, if any, control over which class your child got in. Wouldn't things be so much different if the parents DID have that kind of control? Based on what I witnessed, if you put the horrid social situation aside (shudder) it was very possible for a child to get an excellent education at our high school, IF you knew which teachers were the good ones and IF you could make sure your kid got into those classes. The problem is that it's a toss up and, to hear my students tell it, for every one good teacher (and they do appreciate good teachers) they had so many bad ones. I used to feel so angry about the unfairness of it all, and I got the impression the students felt that way too.

Riceball_Mommy
09-25-2010, 04:29 PM
This is off the subject, but this reminds me of some of the "teachers" at the high school where I used to teach. The history wing was called "Coach's Hall" because so many of the social studies teachers were coaches. The man who taught a few doors down from me used to let his students watch Jerry Springer every day. Another gave them worksheets and read the sports page all day. Some of us worked really hard for these kids but as a parent you had very little, if any, control over which class your child got in. Wouldn't things be so much different if the parents DID have that kind of control? Based on what I witnessed, if you put the horrid social situation aside (shudder) it was very possible for a child to get an excellent education at our high school, IF you knew which teachers were the good ones and IF you could make sure your kid got into those classes. The problem is that it's a toss up and, to hear my students tell it, for every one good teacher (and they do appreciate good teachers) they had so many bad ones. I used to feel so angry about the unfairness of it all, and I got the impression the students felt that way too.

In high school I had 2 English teachers over 4 years (it was odd how that worked out). I loved the one teacher I had her for 10th grade GT English and Honors 12th grade English. I learned so much from her and wish I could have had her all 4 years. The other teacher I had for 9th grade GT English, didn't really like her then, but couldn't stand her come 11th grade AP English. I had some problems with actually being allowed to come to school (had issues with my mother not really having an address), so I came in about 2 weeks late to the semester. The first day I'm in there she says she's just been marking me absent, but hasn't assigned me a seat. So the only open spot is right up front in front of her desk. Which would have been fine except for when we were suppose to be reading she would talk to the girls next to me about prom, homecoming and boys. I only mentioned all the GT and AP to point out that this teacher is supposed to be teaching a college level class and she's disrupting the quiet reading time, by gossiping about high school boys.

I've had a few teachers that I felt lucky to be apart of their class. Then I've had teachers like the one above, and the one gym teacher I had that cheered on a the chant of "--- stinks, Arrid works." It really did make me worry that maybe in some ways my daughter wouldn't get so lucky and maybe with some subjects she'd have the bad fortune I did.

allisonsracquet
09-29-2010, 12:12 PM
As a parent who is new to homeschooling this year, we are unsure. My daughter attends a very pricey private school, and has thrived there. We NEVER had any intention of sending our kids to such a pricey school, but when we moved from CA we found that the schools are very bad here, and she definitely wanted to attend school. Because of the expense (and to be honest, some of the gaps I am now seeing in her education), we are considering homeschooling her next year. My son on the other hand stuggled at 2 schools in the area, and then I decided to homeschool this year. We started in early August and so far, I feel like it is the best decision I have made in a long time! I certainly forsee homeschooling him through the 8th grade (he is currently a 6th grader), but I am a bit concerned about homeschooling through high school. Socially, my son gets plenty of interaction, but I am worried about him getting into the college of his choice (which may just be ignorance of HS on my part) and I am also worried that I won't be able to keep up with the curriculum (particularly the math aspects). I would love to hear from those who have personal experience homeschooling a high schooler (in particular someone who has dealt with college admissions, and tackled teaching the high school curriculum).

Busygoddess
09-29-2010, 03:46 PM
As a parent who is new to homeschooling this year, we are unsure. My daughter attends a very pricey private school, and has thrived there. We NEVER had any intention of sending our kids to such a pricey school, but when we moved from CA we found that the schools are very bad here, and she definitely wanted to attend school. Because of the expense (and to be honest, some of the gaps I am now seeing in her education), we are considering homeschooling her next year. My son on the other hand stuggled at 2 schools in the area, and then I decided to homeschool this year. We started in early August and so far, I feel like it is the best decision I have made in a long time! I certainly forsee homeschooling him through the 8th grade (he is currently a 6th grader), but I am a bit concerned about homeschooling through high school. Socially, my son gets plenty of interaction, but I am worried about him getting into the college of his choice (which may just be ignorance of HS on my part) and I am also worried that I won't be able to keep up with the curriculum (particularly the math aspects). I would love to hear from those who have personal experience homeschooling a high schooler (in particular someone who has dealt with college admissions, and tackled teaching the high school curriculum).

My kids aren't to the point of dealing with college admissions yet, so I can't offer any advice there. I did want to try to set your mind at ease about the high school level work, though. There are so many options out there for high school level curriculum that your problem will be deciding which ones to use.
Personally, for Math, I like Teaching Textbooks if you want something that moves at a traditional pace, offers a decent amount of practice & review, and can be used independantly. If you want something that approaches Math in a less traditional way, moves at a faster pace, and has very little review & practice, I like Life of Fred. Both are really good Math programs, but approach Math in very different ways.

If you look in the Homeschool Curriculum part of this board, you'll find several conversations about High School Level Sciences. It can be a bit harder to find a good, comprehensive, Secular Science for high school, depending on exactly what you're looking for. Some use online Science classes or have their kids do Science at co-op, if they don't feel comfortable teaching it.

Really, though, there's tons of options out there to wade through. You just have to figure out what you're looking for in a curriculum. I'm sure many here can offer advice or opinions on various different curricula, if you wanted to give us an idea of what you're looking for.

The high school level work really isn't hard to get through, though it does seem to scare many. I've heard a lot of homeschoolers say they put their kids in ps once they get to high school because they don't feel they can cover the higher classes properly. With all the options out there for curriculum, supplemental materials, free online stuff, co-ops, etc. it really isn't that hard to do it as good, or better, than the public schools.

dbmamaz
09-29-2010, 05:11 PM
My local inclusive state home school organization put on a mini-conference last year about home schooling high school and beyond. They made it sound really easy to home school and still get in to the college of your choice. The biggest thing they emphasized is to contact the schools your child might be interested and make sure your curriculum meets their requirements. If you are aiming at state schools, often taking community college classes as 'dual enrolled' homschool high school student can save you money as those credits are often accepted by the state schools esp. If you are aiming at competitive schools, often the home school student is able to set him/herself apart from the crowd with projects the child did while following thier own interests in high school. Most schools are now used to dealing with home schoolers. You can also call and see if the schools you are interested in have specific people who deal with the home schoolers, to get more specific ideas about how its handled.

I found that seminar SO helpful!!

CoffeeHeidi
09-29-2010, 09:14 PM
We're definitely in it for the long haul...assuming my husband can continue working 2 full-time jobs which he's been doing for the past 7 years. (I used to bring in 1/2 our income.) Husband would love to consider the private Catholic high school he attended, but unless we win the lottery, there's no way we could afford it. (Our part of NJ is expensive to live in & we can't move because of husband's first job.)

Although we already know some of the curriculum we'll be using (Teaching Textbooks for math) we've been asking around for college textbooks. We know a lot of the staff at Game Stop and as my husband is a manager at a movie theatre, there are a lot of high school and college students. (We're in a college town.) I figure that a lot of college 101 courses are similar enough to high school level that it'd just be easier and cheaper that way.

We'll see when the time comes though. Right now son's only in 7th grade. :)

TammyT
09-30-2010, 12:31 AM
We're playing it by ear, as we do every year. However, we have yet to see any reason for our kids to go to a traditional high school. Our oldest wants to be an architect (he's 12), our middle one wants to go to art school (she's 9) and our youngest, so far, who knows. To do what they want to do, nontraditional is best at this point.

We are considering a dual-enrollment online high school or one of the local community colleges for our older one. But in the meantime, he's focusing on what he's passionate about, and that's math, science, and engineering - although, while I write this, he's going through a "OMG, I want to write a book!" stage... so who knows what the future will hold?

Tammy

archibael
09-30-2010, 01:22 AM
Although we already know some of the curriculum we'll be using (Teaching Textbooks for math) we've been asking around for college textbooks. We know a lot of the staff at Game Stop and as my husband is a manager at a movie theatre, there are a lot of high school and college students. (We're in a college town.) I figure that a lot of college 101 courses are similar enough to high school level that it'd just be easier and cheaper that way.


Given the way education-- even college-- has been dumbed down in the last 30 years, you are 100% correct in your assessment. Nowadays the first year of college is teaching kids stuff they should have learned in high school...

bettyjeanmarino
09-30-2010, 07:54 PM
I would like to think we're in it for the long haul. For our youngest child we definitely are, but my eldest is a very frustrating person. Also, I want to make sure my kids are college prepared if they choose to go to college, so I'm unsure how high school years will go. We're only in elementary now. I think you can take the girl out of homeschool but you can't take the homeschool out of the girl. We'll see how it goes!

mommykicksbutt
10-03-2010, 05:26 PM
... I am a bit concerned about homeschooling through high school. Socially, my son gets plenty of interaction, but I am worried about him getting into the college of his choice (which may just be ignorance of HS on my part) and I am also worried that I won't be able to keep up with the curriculum (particularly the math aspects). I would love to hear from those who have personal experience homeschooling a high schooler (in particular someone who has dealt with college admissions, and tackled teaching the high school curriculum).

Our daughter didn't have one bit of trouble getting into college (her first choice) and is now looking at law school! The graduates of our local homeschool group all got into their first choice college as well and all with scholarships too! The word is out about homeschoolers in the college arena, when a homeschooler applies, the admissions people know that this student will in all likelihood do well in the college environment and with college classes, in many cases, because of the uniqueness of HSing, the application gets greater consideration. The HS student just needs to be prepared through high school for college and what to anticipate in the college admissions process. Each college is different though. And yes, there are still a few ignorant admissions officers who are ignorant of the rigors of homeschooling.

Lee Binz has a website with lots of free info and articles on the subject of HS through high school, beware she does get churchy here and there, but the info is stiff of value.
http://www.thehomescholar.com/

mommykicksbutt
10-03-2010, 05:38 PM
... it really isn't that hard to do it as good, or better, than the public schools.

I totally agree!

We are doing it soooooo much better than our local (the only) school! I know that the biology/chemistry/physics teacher doesn't even teach a lab class, she just shows slides... use awful nasal voice, "this is a my-krow-skope. It is use to see things that are really small." Next slide, "This is an ah-me-bah..."

We have the 1000x microscope, tons of pre made slides, slide making materials, dissection kit, dissection specimens (from earthworm to fetal pig), lots of hands on stuff. I feel so sorry for the brick and mortar kids. Some of sonny's friends asked if we could to labs on the weekends so they could come over and "help." they are so hungry to learn and they are not getting it in school.

dbmamaz
10-03-2010, 05:57 PM
I wonder what I did wrong - my 14 yo seemed fairly uninterested in the microscope. I didnt get any pre-made slides, and we had some trouble seeing things we made. The best was the onion skin - we both got excited about seeing the cells there. but he was whining about it and was content to just read the textbook instead of doing microscope labs, so I let him . . . i couldnt focus on it at all, I hate biology.

Busygoddess
10-03-2010, 06:22 PM
I totally agree!

We are doing it soooooo much better than our local (the only) school! I know that the biology/chemistry/physics teacher doesn't even teach a lab class, she just shows slides... use awful nasal voice, "this is a my-krow-skope. It is use to see things that are really small." Next slide, "This is an ah-me-bah..."



The idiot that taught my Biology & Chem classes (I somehow got stuck with the same teacher both years) didn't even do that much. Both classes were nothing but textbook - read the chapter, answer the questions, take the test. I did dissections in grade school, but my high school Biology class, nothing.

We're doing it so much better than our local district. Dea is doing a lab heavy Biology class this year. I gave her the option to do more specialized History classes for her high school History, instead of the generic overview that's typically done. She starts her high school History classes next year, so I'm working on them now (I have to create them from scratch). She's doing a one year comparative study of Anceint Civilizations and a year on the Middle Ages & Renn for World History. For U.S. History, she got to choose the specific parts of our history she wants to focus on, as of right now this includes - Colonial Times, Pioneers, Prohibition, Salem Witch Trials, Women's Rights, California Gold Rush. She has also decided to do an extra year - a one year study of the American Indian tribes & cultures.

It really is so easy to surpass what the public schools do, if you're willing to put in a little extra effort. There's also the option of packaged programs that are similar in Scope, Sequence, and content to what the public schools use (if you're more comfortable with that route).

Fiddler
10-03-2010, 06:39 PM
On an email list I'm on of a group of moms that got to know each other in an AP playgroup a decade ago, several formerly completely homeschooling parents have all or some of their kids in school now, many of them for the first time ever. The transition to school for kids that have never been "in the system" has been, for the most part, pretty tough, and several moms have commented that they are happy their kids had a chance to acclimate before their grades start being recorded for their high school transcripts. I was planning to wait until ninth to see how Jazz did in (a charter) high school, but now am wondering if eighth grade is a better choice, in order for him to get his sea legs, so to speak. Any thoughts?

dbmamaz
10-03-2010, 10:36 PM
Just curious, did these ap parents do classical, or more of a child-led? I've not heard of any classical kids having trouble, and i've even heard of some very motivated unschoolers doing fine in high school. Why are you putting your oldest in to high school?

Fiddler
10-04-2010, 09:59 AM
These were classical hsers for the most part, and have sought out rigorous schools (public and private). I think it's the strict adherence to dotting all the i's and crossing the t's that is undoing most of the kids. Forget the right book and you get a zero for the day, etc.

We're thinking about sending Jazz to school a) because he wants to go b) because there is a charter school that is a good match for him (a Ted Sizer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Sizer) essential school that emphasizes community service) and c) because I want him to be exposed to new people and ideas, which is hard to do with two younger siblings, one of whom is a serious homebody. He didn't get in for 7th grade (there were hundreds on the waiting list, but his number was in the lower double digits), but we're hopeful he'll get in either in 8th or 9th. And he has a better chance at adapting at this school than his friends have had at others; in fact, at the open house one of the teachers mentioned to us that homeschoolers typically adapt to the school better than kids coming from mainstream public school (it's project based, there are no grades, kids move on to the next level when they're ready, etc.).

dbmamaz
10-04-2010, 04:18 PM
Wow, so cool! I wish there were cool schools around here! Thats one of the things I mentioned on my moms group once. See, people who grew up here, or in the south, think Richmond is a great place. People who have lived other places tend to see Richmond as a small, southern, conservative and somewhat backwards town. I pointed out that, while you can be happy anywhere, in a more liberal town its easier to find like-minded people, and there are more educational options for your kids. Almost all the private schools here are very rigorous and conservative - not even a good fit for my daughter, the one who seemed most likely to succeed in school. And of course, even the 'cool' schools (i've heard of a few) are extremely expensive and expect much more parent involvement than I can muster, and stop at grade 8. The high schools are supposed to be great, but my daughter couldnt cope, and chose to take most of her credits for her last 2 years of high school through the community college - which was lame academically, but not as oppressive socailly.

farrarwilliams
10-04-2010, 09:01 PM
Christina, if that were my kid and that was the school I was considering for him, I wouldn't feel like he needed to go to 8th grade to get his sea legs. The middle school where I taught once upon a time was a place that was sometimes the first stop for homeschooled kids going back to school. The learning curve is steep. There are a lot of "school skills" that kids have to learn about being in groups and moving classes and dealing with a lot of different kinds of stimulation in a day that they're not used to (even if they've had experience in classes and co-ops). It's just different. But assuming he's a mostly with-it kid, then he'll almost certainly be fine by winter holidays. Plus, if it's gradeless! Ah, I love the gradeless schools. Some people think it's hard on the teachers, but I say send those teachers to me and I'll school them on how to knock out fifty written evaluations in an afternoon.

Sam7anthaBurns
10-06-2010, 08:05 AM
Finances are an issue for us as well, our family lives paycheck to paycheck, and it is a struggle to make the most of every single dollar. But even with little to no money I know I can provide a great education for my two boys, and while I tell my mother in-law that we're taking it year by year, secret I know that I'm in it for the long haul. I fully intend to homeschool my kids through high school.

archibael
10-06-2010, 05:45 PM
It looks to me like the biggest cost of homeschooling has to be the books, but if you limit yourself to spines and foreign language books and have a decent library nearby, I don't think it should break the bank. Of course, I kept all my old college textbooks, so we do have a library of our own to draw on.

Beachmum
10-06-2010, 09:02 PM
I think that if we moved we might change our minds. Right now we live in central Illinois and it's not just the type of education, it's the people. I know, I sound awful, I most likely am but these traditional mid-western "values" just don't add up. Our daughter who is 9 insist that she will complete high school by 16 and college by 20 so we're running out of time for her. Our son may never well enter a public institution of learning until College and as for the beach 3.0 due in March...I'm hoping to live somewhere with a nice secular private school to put him or her in but that could just be the back pain talking.

sallymae
10-06-2010, 11:10 PM
We started homeschooling in the 8th grade. We are now in the 10th grade. I've noticed a lot of people are homeschooling through middle school then sending kids to school in high school. In my opinion that's the worst time for kids to be public school. To be academically prepare for college homeschooling is the right way to go. It takes more parent time to select the challenging materials, arrange for SAT testing, and the parent is now a guidance councilor but hey that's why we chose homeschooling for the better education and a child with confidence and high self esteem. There is a lot of information available online for home schooling high schoolers. There are used textbooks available to cut cost. Virtual lab CD's cut cost of lab equipment and if you don't know the subject there is teaching DVD's that you can buy as you go and spread the cost out over the year. Our daughter is already scoring over 300 points higher on the SAT's than the graduating seniors at our local high schools. Colleges accept home schoolers and there is plenty of scholarships out there but you have to find them. Check library, college admissions, and online. Go for it! We are.

Aandwsmom
10-07-2010, 12:46 PM
We are on the teeter-totter about this one!
The original plan was to homeschool oldest DS for 6th grade only... get him caught up and then send him to 7th grade at middle school. That was the plan on the day we pulled him from public school!
He jumped into homeschooling and learning with both feet and did so well, that DH(totally against the homeschooling idea) said we were homeschooling forever! We eventually pulled our other DS out of 5th grade and homeschooled him as well.
We are now on our 3rd year homeschooling, boys are in 7th and 8th grade.
We want to homeschool thru high school but not sure if it beneficial to the boys(we havent found an online program we like yet). I have found a K-12 public school here in Portland that I would like to check out for them for high school. Small classes, lets kids learn how it is best for them, etc. Issue is getting them there. It is downtown Portland, other side of the river. I would have to get a 2nd vehicle and load up all the daycare kids(4-6 in carseats) to take my kids to school and pick them up...... but if we feel that is better, we will figure out a way to do it.
We have a few months to decide WHAT we want to do and even that is not set in stone. We may do 9th grade while we explore options. I do know we are NOT sending them to the public high school that is within our boundary lines. It sucks and since they are closing it down and shuffling all the kids to other high schools within the next 2 yrs..... that just means MORE over-crowding at the schools which is less attention or help given to kids who need it, etc. etc. Trust me, I could get on a soapbox about Portland Public Schools and their quality right now!!LOL

I love homeschooling though!! I would love for my kids to be homeschooled thru high school. The socialization part, dating, etc. is the part I am worried about. Both ways, keeping them home and they do not get enough socialization or learn how to talk to girls,etc. AND letting them go to public school and being around girls!!LOL

MamaB2C
10-07-2010, 02:56 PM
The socialization part, dating, etc. is the part I am worried about. Both ways, keeping them home and they do not get enough socialization or learn how to talk to girls,etc.
Are there no outside interests, hobbies, clubs, or teams that would put them in the proximity of girls and other teens to socialize with? I have always found meeting people through shared enthusiasms and interests is way better for quality relationships than meeting people through a fluke of shared space.

Aandwsmom
10-07-2010, 03:25 PM
Are there no outside interests, hobbies, clubs, or teams that would put them in the proximity of girls and other teens to socialize with? I have always found meeting people through shared enthusiasms and interests is way better for quality relationships than meeting people through a fluke of shared space.

We have a homeschool group we see occasionally, but no girls their age! Oldest is into Tae Kwon Do and we do it at the comm. center but not a lot of time for meeting girls there. Neither one of them are sports oriented nor have any interest in it. I would love to get them into something like 4-H but not a lot of that here in city central.

Hence we are stuck on what to do......

MamaB2C
10-07-2010, 03:41 PM
4H offers drama and arts and all kinds of non-agricultural curriculums these days. I am in the process of starting a 4H club in my area, because the existing ones are too focused (a drama club, and equestrian club, and a Christian homeschooler club). With a daycare it may be difficult for you to do the actual organizing and such, but certainly call your county extension (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/metro4h/)coordinator and find out if there are any new clubs starting in your area and looking for members.


Are your kids into photography, conservation/environmental issues, or anything like that?

dbmamaz
10-07-2010, 04:09 PM
I want to point out that, for some geeky boys, the first girlfreind often wont happen until they are 20, anyways. I've known many . . .